Archive for May, 2005

Secure your office, create gift cards and more with a digital card printer.

Monday, May 2nd, 2005

ID Card PrinterDigital card printers make photo identification easy and are now something any computer literate person can use. Thanks to increasing popularity and use, supplies are more cost effective and will run you less than
the older Polaroid-style composite photo ID cameras. With a complex and increasingly dangerous world, a digital card printer is a necessity for both security and safety.

Polaroid cameras used to be the norm for photo ID. A picture was taken, removed from the camera and about 60 seconds to two minutes after the picture was developed it was cut to size. The photograph was then later attached to a pre-printed template, where it was later laminated and punched for use with a lanyard or badge holder. Although Polaroid photo ID systems are decreasing in popularity, they still have their place with low-volume photo ID production and small businesses.

The newer digital card printers use a process called die sublimation, where the color ribbon uses several different colored panels to create a full-color image. The quality of the image is as good and in many cases

better than the older Polaroid-style composite ID systems. Most of these ribbons can create around 100 ID cards before being changed. Although the digital printer may seem like a large investment up front, the cost to operate it, purchase blank PVC cards and ribbons actually saves you money over the long run in comparison to the composite systems. Software can be used to help create a basic template

A digital photograph can then be placed on the template, a logo can be added and text written. The full-color card can later be printed as easily as using your ink-jet printer. The saved card and template makes replacement cards easy. Once the card is printed, it can be placed in a badge holder or be punched for use with a lanyard or badge reel.

Digital ID cards are commonly used for businesses, colleges and for other IDs. They are also used for hotel keys, gift cards and more thanks to an optional magnetic stripe encoder. Magnetic stripes are the dark lines located on the back of your common credit card. Lines of data can be written to that stripe with the digital card printer. Digital cards can also be factory built with a smart card encoder. Smart cards are computer chips that store data such as a name, address, account information and more.

If you work for a business, university or would like to create gift or novelty cards, a digital card printer may be for you. They will provide you with added security, versatility and the ability to create an ID card for any situation or occasion. To see our entire line of digital photo ID card printers, you can find them here.

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