Archive for June, 2006

Counterfeit money continues to be a growing problem.

Friday, June 30th, 2006

Counterfeit Money DetectorsWe recently brought out several counterfeit money detectors to see how effective they were against fake currency. We tested out money from local businesses and banks. We also threw in a few sheets of blank paper.

The counterfeit detectors did their job and were able to decipher real from fake. This is especially hard with today’s technology.

Copy machines, high-resolution printers, scanners and more can make it easy to copy money. Criminals can use just about any personal computer to try and copy bills. Many bills appear legitimate and may be difficult to verify with the naked eye. Counterfeit bill detectors use a variety of methods to verify money.

The three most common types of counterfeit detection methods are UV (ultraviolet), WM (watermark) and MG (magnetic). UV detectors have a dark light that makes built-in features in tangible currency light up and appear yellowish green. Watermark detectors have a built-in light that allows users to see watermarks such as a face. MG detectors detect magnetic ink that is in U.S. currency. When a bill is slid over the MG detector, a light or other indicator will let the user know if it is authentic or fake.

The pen detector is another widely used device. It uses a chemical solution that uses coloration to determine bill authenticity. Magnifying glasses are also a great way to pick out minute details that a printer can’t easily reproduce.

Many criminals are bleaching five-dollar bills and printing 50 and 100-dollar denominations on the paper. This makes the bill feel real and will even pass through some counterfeit detectors. It is recommended to use a detector that implements several detection methods or a combination of several counterfeit detectors.

You can see all our counterfeit detectors by going here.

Digitally record sounds and speeches with a voice recorder.

Tuesday, June 20th, 2006

Digital Voice RecordersWe recently added three new digital voice recorders to our Web site. These recorders are used to capture sound, speeches, conversations and even phone calls. These new voice recorders are the equivalent for recording sound as the digital camera is for capturing images. These recorders store the audio, some up to 65 hours that can later be transferred to a computer for editing or later note taking.

Digital voice recorders are commonly used by students, doctors and lawyers for recording interviews, speeches and more. Rather than having to worry about a tape, all the data is stored digitally in the recorder that can later be stored to a computer and burned to a CD. Tapes tend to lose their integrity over time. Digital data will retain its integrity for years. Tapes limited to a small amount of space, usually ranging 20 to 90 minutes. The sound quality with digital recorders is far better than traditional analog tapes.

A wide variety of businesses and professions prefer to use voice recorders. Doctors will record medical findings, students will record class lectures and private investigators/reporters will use them for gathering data. These are just a few examples. A built-in speaker, or included headset, lets you listen to previous recordings on the spot.

Digital voice recorders are very compact, and do not need to make space for a cassette tape. They can easily in a purse or pocket. A phone attachment makes it possible to record conversations for investigational work or for preserving memories. You can see ABC Office’s entire line of digital voice recorders by going here.

The Max-Bantam counts paper with speed and precision.

Monday, June 12th, 2006

Max Bantam Paper CounterThere are many paper counters out there designed to count large stacks of paper quickly and efficiently. Many of the paper counters out there measure the thickness of a stack of paper and give a precise “estimate” of the total number of sheets. I figured this must be one of the quickest and most economical ways to count paper.

ABC Office eventually came across the Max-Bantom paper counter. This paper counter counts ever single sheet, rather than measure the thickness of the stack. This gives you a precise total every time. I counted a stack of 388 sheets of paper four times, and the counter came up with 388 every time.

The Max-Bantom was easy to set up and use. I was surprised to find that batch counting could be done with the push of a few buttons. I decided to set the machine up for batch counting every 20 sheets. After 20 sheets, the counter placed a tab in the stack of paper.

This paper counter is certainly worth looking at if you are in the market for a fast paper counter that can keep precise count of paper inventory. We are in the process of getting the video ready for the Web, but you are certainly more than welcome to request a live video demo. Our customer service reps will get a camera and show you every little detail over the Internet.

You can sign up for the live video demo by going here.

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