Archive for the ‘Binding Machines’ Category

Akiles iCoil 41+ Spiral Binding Machine Review

Thursday, May 21st, 2015
The Akiles iCoil 41+ spiral binder comes loaded with several features

The Akiles iCoil 41+ Spiral Binding Machine

 

 

Coil Binding’s Full Meal Deal

 

You know how you might enjoy a $5 Buck Lunch at Dairy Queen with a bacon cheeseburger, fries, drink, plus a sundae. Well, the Akiles iCoil 41+ Spiral binding machine draws several similarities. Just like the $5 Buck Lunch is a hearty deal that will keep your belly satisfied for several hours, the iCoil 41+ comes loaded with features not commonly found in a coil binding machine in its class.

 

The iCoil 41+ has a 4:1 pitch hole pattern that produces oval-shaped punched holes. This feature makes it easier to insert/spin the PVC binding coils through the punched pages. Oval-shaped holes also make it easier to turn the pages in a document. They improve the document binding process by as much as 50 percent.

 

The iCoil includes coil crimping pliers, an accessory you typically purchase separately from the coil binding machine. There’s a clever little electric coil inserter that’s concealed under the machine’s lid. This design makes the unit more compact for storage. The anti-dust cover also helps keep the machine interior clean when not in use. The iCoil 41+ has built-in coil measuring guides that enable you to select the correct coil size for the number of pages you are using. The machine’s vertical punching design improves document sheet alignment and reduces punching slip-ups and errors.

 

This coil binder by Akiles has an ergonomically designed punch handle that provides almost effortless punching. There’s also an electric foot pedal to activate the electric coil inserter. This makes coil binding fast and easy.

 

You will simplify your coil binding work with the Akiles iCoil Plus. This convenient and compact coil binding system gets the job done quickly and efficiently. Be sure to contact ABC Office today for more details about the Akiles iCoil 41+ Spiral Binding Machine.

 

Tamerica Optimus-46i Coil Binding Machine Review

Monday, May 18th, 2015
coil binder, coil binding, 4:1 pitch, coil punch, oval holes

The Optimus-46i

The Tamerica Optimus-46i Coil Binding machine is an impressive little model that’s affordably priced. You typically find machines with its capabilities in the $400-$700 price tag range.

The Optimus-46i has fully disengageable punch pins.  This allows you to punch and bind a wide variety of documents of different sizes. The pull-out punch pins help you avoid unseemly half-punched papers.

The coil inserter located on the top of the machine offers a new and innovative twist to document binding. It features a grooved silicone roller that makes it smoother and simpler to insert the PVC coil into a punched stack of paper.

The Optimus-46i from Tamerica offers further simplicity and efficiency with its foot-operated pedal. This operates the machine’s punch dies, or pins. This added feature alone helps free up your hands and improves your productivity.

There are also other useful features including oval punched holes — this makes it much easier to insert coil. There’s adjustable depth control and you can punch up to 20 sheets of copy paper at a time.

Be sure to contact ABC Office today to learn more about the Tamerica Optimus-46i Coil Binding Machine.

 

Coil Binding Machine Review: Akiles CoilMac-EPI Plus 4:1

Friday, June 6th, 2014

Akiles CoilMac-EPI Plus Review

Akiles CoilMac-EPI Plus 4:1


Akiles CoilMac-EPI Plus 4:1 Coil Binding Machine w/ Inserter (Oval Holes)

I recently had a customer ask me to explain the differences between two electric coil binding machines: The Akiles CoilMac-EPI Plus 4:1 and Renz SPB 360 Comfort Electric Coil Binding Machine. These are both high-volume, quality coil binding machines engineered to withstand heavy use throughout the workday. We rarely receive complaints from customers about either brand.

The Renz SPB 360 is a tried and tested model that offers several features needed for high-volume document binding. It has a unique built-in coil-crimping device that cuts and bends excess binding coil, eliminating the need for crimping pliers.

Over the years, however, I have been very impressed with how Akiles has been able to design a binding machine that has so many features to offer for such a modest price. When I entered the document finishing industry over 12 years ago, Renz was pretty much the dominant force in high-end binding machines. That prominence has changed since then, thanks to the determination of the product engineers from Akiles. They have not only successfully competed in the document binding machine market, but have surpassed their competition in several key areas.

Most coil binding machines punch round holes. The Akiles CoilMac-EPI Plus 4:1 does not. This unique electric coil-binding machine actually punches out oval-shaped holes with its built-in electric punch. This slight modification in hole design dramatically speeds up the coil insertion process. This allows for slightly more space for the coil to move within and reduces the frustration often encountered when coil and punched paper don’t always exactly match up. The machine’s 54 punch pins may be disengaged so that you can create custom-sized documents and books.

The Akiles CoilMac-EPI Plus, with rugged all-metal construction, boasts a high volume punch capacity of 25 sheets. This rating applies to 20 lb. standard copy paper. The punch motor has reverse anti-jam feature that helps you dislodge stacks of paper or covers that were too thick.

The machine also provides a full-length, heavy-duty electric coil inserter on the front of the unit for convenient coil insertion. The CoilMac-EPI Plus comes with a built-in coil diameter selector and premium oval coil crimping pliers.

When you are ready to order your electric coil binding machine, be sure to mention this article to save an additional seven percent!

How to use a Wire Binding Machine

Wednesday, February 26th, 2014

“How do I use my new wire binding machine?”

The Akiles WireMac Wire Binding Machine Comes Highly Recommended

Akiles WireMac

That was the question I was asked earlier today from one of our customers. He recently purchased a popular wire binding machine model from ABC Office and he had a lot of questions about how to use his new wire binder. His binding machine was perfectly fine, he was simply new to the whole binding process.

Thankfully, ABC Office has produced over the years in-depth video demos that have  helped hundreds of customers with the set up and operation process of their binding machines and other office equipment. I pointed him in the direction of this Akiles WireMac wire binding machine video demo we produced in-house several years ago. The picture and sound may not be the optimum quality that you expect today, but this was considered cutting-edge back in 2003 (when we made the video)!

The demonstrator was David Stuart, our marketing supervisor. David had about 15 years experience with most of our office equipment, so he definitely knew what he was talking about. The video, although about 11 years old, still holds up just fine today. David offers several helpful hints on how to initially set up your machine for optimum punching and binding. He also demonstrates how you can produce a professionally looking bound document, thanks to placing the back cover on the top of your document before crimping the wire shut.

If you have any questions about using your wire binding machine, the video demo I mentioned covers just about everything you will need to know. However, if you still have questions we would love to talk to you. You may still have concerns about the best report covers to use, what’s the best wire pitch for your needs (2:1 or 3:1) or what brand/models we recommend. Call 1-800-658-8788 with your questions today. We look forward to helping you with your new wire binding machine!

What Makes a Good Comb Binding Machine?

Friday, February 21st, 2014

Comb Binding Machines - Features to ConsiderCustomers ask me all the time, “What features do I need in a comb binding machine?” It’s a good question and I would like to point out some “must-have” features and some “optional” features. While most comb binding machines share a lot in common, some have some very cool and unique tools you may want to consider for your business. Before I go much further into this article, you can find our entire selection of comb binding machines and supplies by visiting us here.

So what is comb binding? Comb binding is a method used to organize and bind multiple sheets of paper into booklet format. These machines punch a total of 19 holes along the 11” side of a sheet of paper. Once the holes are punched, a plastic 19-ring comb spine is inserted through the holes and closed shut. This plastic spine is what holds the paper together. These style of binding has been around for literally decades and is one of the most affordable ways to bind a book, presentation or report.

Advantages of Comb – Comb binding is affordable, plain and simply. The machines don’t run too much money and a box of 100 combs can usually be purchased for under $10 (often much less). Comb binding allows the spines to be re-opened to remove or add additional pages. The combs themselves are very resilient and are available in a variety of different colors.

Disadvantages of Comb – Comb binding elements can wear out over time and with excessive use, causing the spine to open a little resulting in pages falling out. While this is rare, it can happen. Comb binding also doesn’t allow pages to be wrapped around 360 degrees like coil binding does.

I would now like to cover common and not-so-common features you can find in a comb-binding machine.

  • Side Margin Control – This is the guide that allows you to adjust the positioning the paper left and right. Almost all comb binders have this feature.
  • Margin Depth Control – This is a feature that allows you to set how far into the paper the holes are punched. This is nice if you are binding a variety of book thicknesses. You may want to punch further into the paper when binding thicker books to prevent pages from tearing out. Only about have of the machines out there offer this feature.
  • Manual / Electric Punch – Comb binding machines are available with manual or electric punches, not both. You’ll have to choose. Most people go with manual punches unless they are binding a lot of books per day. I generally recommend electric for people who are binding dozens or more books per day. Electric really does cut down on fatigue.
  • Vertical / Horizontal Punch – Most comb binding machines have a vertical punch, where you lay the paper flat on the surface while punching the paper. Some manufacturers have designed machines with a vertical punch, where the paper stands on its end while being punched. The vertical punch can be nice because it keeps the edges of the paper lined up during the entire process using gravity.
  • Singe / Double Handle – Some comb binding machines use dual handles for punching and binding, where others use a single handle. Single-handle machines punch paper when the handle is pulled and open plastic combs (using the metal comb fingers) when the handle is pushed back. Dual handle units have one hand that punches and another that opens the combs.
  • Disengageable Dies – Have you ever punched paper only to end up with a half-punched hole on the edge? It can ruin the entire book. While side-to-side margin adjustments can fix some of this, it isn’t going to fix everything…especially when binding odd sizes of paper. Machines with desengageable dies allow you to disable specific punching dies. If you have a half-punched hole, simply disengage that die. You could, although I don’t know why you would want to, punch every other hole using a machine equipped with fully disengageable dies.
  • Plastic / Metal Build – Machines vary in build quality. While they all use metal punching pins, the gears, handle and body of the machine can vary in build quality. As you might imagine, lesser expensive machines typically utilize more plastic in the design where higher-end machines use more metal. Some manufactures, like Akiles, use a lot of metal in their machines.

I hope this helps. There is a lot of information there to assimilate. If you still have questions, please don’t hesitate to call us at 1-800-658-8788. We would love to help you out. Thanks again for reading!

Duplo DB-280 Commercial Perfect Binding Machine Review

Wednesday, August 7th, 2013

Duplo DB-280 Perfect Binding MachineAre you familiar to what a paperback or softback book is? This is a book that consists of several pages that are glued to a cover, resulting in a bound book. While this description may sound simple, the process really isn’t that complicated. The process of binding paperback books is known as perfect binding. I would like to review one of the best semi-auto perfect binding machines on the market, the Duplo DB-280 (found here).

Perfect binding is extremely popular for binding paperback books, for padding paper and much more. You will find books, manuals, guides and even some magazines bound using perfect binding. The process usually involves some sort of hot glue that is rolled onto the flat edge of several sheets of paper after which the sheets are moved onto some sort of cover that is wrapped around the paper and crimped on. Once the glue is dry, the book is done.

The Duplo DB-280 is a perfect binding machine right down to its core. It is what I would consider to be a semi-automated machine. While it does apply glue and crimp the cover onto the booklet, you do have to manually insert the paper. The DB-280 is the first in a line of several heavy-duty perfect binding machines offered by Duplo. Other larger machines include the KB-4000 PUR, DPB-500 PUR and DPB-500.

The DB-280 is designed to be very easy to use and operate, taking just a few minutes to set the thickness of the glue and to make a few additional adjustments. It is rated at producing up to about 200 books per hour, making it a great machine for on-demand applications or for short-run use. It can be used to perfect bind books, but can also be used to simply apply glue to a stack of paper for padding purposes. It can also be used to apply tape to a spine for a unique look.

Here is a video of the Duplo DB-280 perfect binding machine in use:

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One of the biggest complaints of perfect binding machines is the odor. The DB-280 uses a unique glue formula that dramatically cuts down on smell, making it a great option for indoor use. This is a huge advantage over many cheaper machines out there that churn out loads of odor and smoke.

One thing I am impressed with about this machine is the quality. The DB-280 really does produce books that are completely professional and look equally as good as anything you’ll find on some of the larger floor machines. This machine does a great job of applying a smooth even layer of glue over the paper’s edge and you don’t need to worry about excess glue or mess squeezing or spilling out over the edges during the perfect binding process.

There are a few additional tools I recommend you consider using when perfect binding. The two additional tools I recommend include paper joggers and stack paper cutters. Here’s why I recommend using them:

  • Paper Joggers (found here) – When paper comes off a printing press or a copy machine, the paper is often off skews or jumbled around a bit. Paper joggers are used to square up the edges of paper by vibrating them together. Whenever we use a perfect binding machine out on our showroom floor, we almost always jog the paper prior to running them through the machine.
  • Stack Paper Cutters (found here) – If you’re worried about the edges of your book not being perfectly smooth (which is common), you may want to use a stack paper cutter. These cutters can handle hundreds of sheets of paper at a time and are commonly used to square up the three non-bound edges of the book.

The DB-280 is a robust machine and you may have additional questions prior to making a purchase. Please feel free to give us a call at 1-800-658-8788 with any questions. We accept credit cards, checks, purchase orders and you can even lease this machine. Our Service Department is able to provide additional parts, supplies and service as needed.

How Does a Binding Machine Work?

Tuesday, July 23rd, 2013

Book Binding MachinesHave you ever toyed around with the idea of binding your own book? Have you ever wondered exactly how a book binding machine works? Having used binding machines (found here) for well over a decade, I can safely tell you that anyone can use one. I would like to cover exactly how a binding machine works and what all is involved in the binding process. Read on for more information.

Book binding machines come in all shapes and sizes, but when all is said and done, they all work on a very similar way. The three most commonly used binding formats are comb, wire and coil. Many people also like using VeloBind. Each of these binding formats are designed to hold multiple pieces of paper together using a binding element. The binding element is much like a staple, but one that goes along the entire edge of the paper to create a book.

Most binding machines operate in a matter of just 4 steps.

  • Step 1 – The first thing you’ll want to do is set up your machine. This usually adjusting the side margin control to ensure the holes are punching where they should. I personally like to take a single sheet of paper and punch it to ensure everything is set up and operating correctly. If the holes are off, I make further adjustments.
  • Step 2 – Once the machine is set up, you will begin to punch holes in the paper you wish to bind. The amount of paper a machine can bind can range anywhere from 5 to 40 or more sheets, depending on the machine. Binding your book may require multiple passes of the punch depending on how thick you want your book to be.
  • Step 3 – Once all of the holes are punched, you can begin inserting the binding element into the holes. With comb this involves using a comb opener to open the comb for insertion. With wire you will manually insert the twin loop through the holes. With coil you will spin the spring-like elements through the punched holes.
  • Step 4 – Once the element has been inserted through the hole, you will need to finalize the book. With comb this involves closing the comb. With wire this involves closing the wire. With coil this involves cutting off the excess coil and crimping the ends.

Here is a video of a comb binding machine being used:

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As you can see, the binding process is extremely easy. Most people can bind a ¼” thick book in a matter of a minute or two. Most machines can be used to bind a book anywhere from a few pages up to an inch or so.

Binding machines come in a variety of different configurations depending on the volume you intend to bind on a daily basis. Features that may speed up the process including things like an electric motor (versus manual) for punching the paper.

Here are a few additional features you may want to consider when buying a binding machine:

  • Disengageable Dies – If you have ever used a binding machine, you may have run into the issue of a half-punched hole at the edge of the paper. While this can often be fixed by adjusting the side margin guide, sometimes the size of the paper makes this very difficult. Machines that use disengageable dies (aka selectable punching pins) allow you to choose which holes punch or don’t punch. If you are running into half-punched holes, you can simply disable that die to prevent that from happening.
  • Adjustable Margin Depth – If you are punching books of varying thicknesses, you may want to consider using a machine with an adjustable margin depth. This allows you to select how far into the paper the holes are punched. People binding thicker books often need to punch a little farther into the paper to prevent the pages from accidentally tearing out.
  • Diameter Selector Tool – Matching the binding element with the size of the book you want to bind can be a tricky thing to do. Many binding machines now come with a diameter selector tool that makes it easy to determine the size of the supply you need based on the amount of pages you are binding.

At ABC Office we have decades of experience with binding machines. Please feel free to call us at 1-800-658-8788 with any binding related questions. We can help you find the correct supplies for your machine, find the right machine for the job and we can help track down parts.

Five Things to Bind with Your New Binding Machine

Tuesday, July 9th, 2013

Have you recently purchased a binding machine and now aren’t quite sure what to do with it? Whether you are using it at home or in the office, there is always something that can be bound. Having dealt with many customers over the years, I have heard of a lot of things (normal and strange) that people have bound. I would like to share five of the top things people bind with their machines.

Binding machines come in a wide variety of formats. The three most popular are comb, wire and coil (found here). All three of these binding formats, while different, can be used to bind many of the same things. The nice thing about binding machines is that they are very easy to use, can be used with most types of paper and the supplies are relatively cheap.

Five Things To Bind With Your New Binding Machine

  1. Custom Bound BookBooks – Many people use binding machines to bind their own books. This is sometimes for retail sale purposes and other times for hobby purposes. I have had parents even call up wanting a machine so their kid could bind their own book. The nice thing about a binding machine, especially those with selectable pins, is they can be used to bind books in all different sizes and thicknesses. I have seen people bind children’s books, automotive manuals and much more.
  2. Bound Scrapbook or Photo AlbumScrapbooks / Photo Albums – Over the past five years I have seen a huge increase in customers buying binding machines to bind their own scrapbooks. Those scrapbooks have to be put together somehow and a comb, wire or binding machine allows you to customize the book in your own way. Comb, wire and coil is also all available in a variety of colors and sizes, allowing you to easily match or compliment your scrapbook or photo album’s cover and design. Binding machines can be used create baby scrapbooks, family scrapbooks, memory books, photo albums and much more.
  3. Bound CookbookCookbooks – I can’t begin to tell you how many people I’ve spoken with have used their binding machine to make a cookbook. It is often for personal use, to create something for the family, a church or a neighborhood. Coil and comb are probably the two most common formats used for binding a cookbook. Coil is especially popular because the pages can be wrapped around, freeing up counter space during cooking. While coil is popular, comb is also very popular simply because it is extremely affordable and can be reopened for adding or removing pages.
  4. Bound Presentation or ReportReports / Presentations – I can’t leave out reports and presentations. This is what most businesses use binding machines for. They are excellent for creating quick presentations and reports in a professional way. Twin loop wire is probably most common for binding a professional report. These books are usually no more than ¼” thick at the most. They are also excellent for binding promotional sales material.
  5. Bound School AlbumSchool Albums – Many schools like to use binding machines, especially comb, for binding school projects on an elementary school level. They can be used to bind English assignments, art projects, journals and much more. Kids love to bind their own material and it really gives them a feeling of accomplishment when they see their own material in a bound format.

At ABC Office we have been selling binding machines for decades (since 1980). We are extremely familiar with all the binding formats out there and would love to help you out. You can reach us by calling 1-800-658-8788. You can find our entire selection of binding machines here.

Metal Coil vs. PVC Coil for Binding

Tuesday, June 25th, 2013

Coil Binding SuppliesCoil binding is THE most popular binding method used today. It has quickly passed up coil and comb for many reasons. For many reasons, the most popular binding coil used today is PVC coil. I still get many people, however, that ask me about the older metal coil and which is better. I would like to cover coil binding in general and explain the differences between metal coil and PVC coil. You can find our coil binding machines here.

Coil binding is a method of binding where spiral-like coils (much like springs) are inserted through pre-punched holes in paper. The spring-like nature of the coils allow punched paper to glide along the binding spine, making page turns easy, fast and seamless. Coil also allows pages to turn a full 360 degrees and allows pages to lay entirely flat.

Akiles CoilMac-ER PlusCoil binding comes in two different hole patterns. These include 4:1 pitch and 5:1 pitch (found here). In the United States of America, the 4:1 pitch is almost always used with 5:1 pitch being rare. The pitch of the coil is the hole pattern used. A 4:1 pitch consists of four holes per inch of paper and a 5:1 pitch is five holes per inch. The hole pattern you use depends a lot on how much paper you are binding (larger spacing means higher capacity) and your own personal preference.

As mentioned earlier, there is both metal and PVC coil binding. Here are some of the differences between the two:

  • Metal Coil – As a general rule, the metal coil is used on an industrial level for binding things like spiral notebooks for ruled paper. Metal coil is usually a shiny metal, silver or chrome color, although colored metal coil is available. One reason many people and businesses are moving away from metal coil is because it tends to bend easily, making page turns more difficult.
  • PVC Coil – This type of coil is used by most businesses and for home binding purposes. It is also beginning to find its way into more industrial binding applications for spiral notebooks. PVC coil does not bend, making it far more long lasting and durable than metal coil. Black is the most common color, although white and clear are other popular colors. You can buy PVC coils in a variety of colors including blue, green, brown, yellow, orange and much more.

The binding machines we offer at ABC Office are designed to be used with PVC coils. We get asked frequently if metal coils can be used with PVC coil machines. If the hole patterns line up, there is no reason you can’t use a PVC coil machine to punch the holes for metal coil. Be aware, however, that the coil crimping pliers will NOT work with metal coil. The inserter should work fine as long as there are no burs on the metal coil. The inserter used on PVC coil binding machine is made out of rubber and may scratch or tear if put in contact with low quality metal wire.

We have a lot of years working with coil binding machines and a lot of experience. Combined, we have near 85 years worth of binding machine experience and knowledge we can share with you. Please feel free to give us a call at 1-800-658-8788. You can find our entire selection of coil binding machines here.

How to use Coil Crimping Pliers

Thursday, June 20th, 2013

Coil Crimping Pliers for Coil BindingIf you own a coil binding machine, you have either mastered or have gotten very frustrated with the final step of the binding process; the coil crimping pliers (found here). If you have coil crimping pliers, or you are considering buying a coil binder, you will want to read this article. I am going to go through the coil crimping process step by step. This guide should help you to master the art of coil crimping.

Coil binding supplies come in 12″ lengths for use in binding 11″ documents. The added length is done on purpose. Once a coil is spun through paper that has been punched for coil, the coil supply is spun through. The result is about ½” of excess coil on each end of the book. This allows the operator of the machine to cut off and crimp the excess coil. The crimping prevents the coil from spinning back out. The process is actually quite ingenuous and it works well.

Coil crimping pliers look a lot like needle nose pliers. They are relatively small and fit in the palm of your hand. Some binding machines include the pliers, where others require you to purchase them separately. The are spring loaded and all you really need to do is position them correctly and squeeze them shut. Here is a step-by-step guide on exactly how to use them:

  1. Pick up the book you are binding with your left hand.
  2. Grab the coil crimping pliers with your right.
  3. Point the red dot on the coil crimping pliers towards the document you are binding.
  4. Insert the coil into the mouth of the pliers. The closer you can get to the edge of the book the better.
  5. Squeeze the crimping pliers.
  6. If done correctly, it will cut of excess coil and will crimp the coil 40 to 90 degrees, preventing the coils from slipping back out.
  7. Repeat this process for the other side of the book. You can switch hands if you are left handed.

Sometimes seeing this done is even more helpful. Here is a video demo of coil crimping pliers in use.

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Once you have the technique down, it really isn’t that hard. I can crimp both sizes of a document in under 10 seconds easily and often faster. It definitely looks far more complicated than it really is. If you don’t want to bother with coil crimping pliers, or you simply want to speed up the process, there are machines out there that cut and crimp both sides off simultaneously. An example of a coil crimping machine is the Akiles Finish-A-Coil E1 (found here)

I have had many people ask me if they can simply use needle nose pliers. You can, but you have to be more careful and the process is slower. Most people take the needle nose pliers, cut off the excess coil and then using the sample pliers to bend the coil over.

I hope this guide helps you out! If you still have questions, or need help, please feel free to give us a call at 1-800-658-8788. We would love to help you out. We also have a great selection of coil binding machines (found here) and coil binding supplies (found here).

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