Posts Tagged ‘laminator speed control’

Eight Questions you Should ask Before Buying a Laminator

Thursday, May 12th, 2016
Tahsin Tamerica TCC2700 27-Inch Thermal Roll Laminator

Roll Laminator

 

1. When Should I Use a Roll Laminator? When Should I Use a Pouch Laminator?

It really depends on the size of the document you are laminating and the volume you need to laminate. Traditionally, it was assumed that pouch laminators were used for small documents and roll laminators were used for large documents. This still holds true to a certain point, but volume also plays a big role. You can still laminate small documents on a roll laminator, but just a lot more at a time. If you plan to laminate a few small items on occasion, you might as well use a pouch laminator and save yourself wasted film. Also, be aware that a roll laminator will take up a lot more space than a pouch laminator. The methods used between the two machines are different, but the end result looks the same.

2. Why Do Some Laminators Have a Reverse Button?

If for any reason your pouch or roll laminator gets jammed, the reverse function is excellent for backing out documents for re-adjustment or clearing jams. This is especially nice when loading film rolls on a roll laminator. It is not uncommon to accidentally feed a document through a pouch laminator crooked, in which case the reverse function is a must-have.

3. Why Do Some Laminators Have a Temperature Control?

Temperature control is nice for adjusting the heat to accommodate various thicknesses and styles of lamination film. Different mil thicknesses and types of lamination film melt at different temperatures. Several laminators come with preset temperatures, but many higher-end laminators come with a fully variable temperature control.

4. What Is The Purpose of the Speed Controller?

Speed control is another way to help control the quality of the laminated product. Some films, in conjunction with temperature control, need the speed to be adjusted for optimal quality.

5. What Mil Thickness Is Best to Use?

The mil thickness used depends entirely on what you will be laminating and how rigid you want the end result to be. If you are laminating cardstock, thicker film may not be required. If you are laminating 20-pound paper, you may want some lamination film that is a little thicker. One of the most common lamination film thicknesses purchased is 5mil.

6. After I run Something Through the Laminator, What Does it Mean When the Film is Cloudy?

If the lamination film is cloudy, you are running your laminator too cold and need to increase the temperature. The cloudiness is un-melted film.

7. What Causes Lamination Film to Ripple?

If the film is rippling, your laminator is running too hot. Turn down the laminator temperature. That should eliminate the ripples.

8. What Does it Mean if the Film has Bubbles?

If the film has bubbles, the laminator is running too hot. If the laminator is too hot, the film can boil and bubble. Turn down the laminator temperature. This should eliminate the problem.

 

 

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