Posts Tagged ‘Pouch Laminator’

Eight Questions you Should ask Before Buying a Laminator

Thursday, May 12th, 2016
Tahsin Tamerica TCC2700 27-Inch Thermal Roll Laminator

Roll Laminator

 

1. When Should I Use a Roll Laminator? When Should I Use a Pouch Laminator?

It really depends on the size of the document you are laminating and the volume you need to laminate. Traditionally, it was assumed that pouch laminators were used for small documents and roll laminators were used for large documents. This still holds true to a certain point, but volume also plays a big role. You can still laminate small documents on a roll laminator, but just a lot more at a time. If you plan to laminate a few small items on occasion, you might as well use a pouch laminator and save yourself wasted film. Also, be aware that a roll laminator will take up a lot more space than a pouch laminator. The methods used between the two machines are different, but the end result looks the same.

2. Why Do Some Laminators Have a Reverse Button?

If for any reason your pouch or roll laminator gets jammed, the reverse function is excellent for backing out documents for re-adjustment or clearing jams. This is especially nice when loading film rolls on a roll laminator. It is not uncommon to accidentally feed a document through a pouch laminator crooked, in which case the reverse function is a must-have.

3. Why Do Some Laminators Have a Temperature Control?

Temperature control is nice for adjusting the heat to accommodate various thicknesses and styles of lamination film. Different mil thicknesses and types of lamination film melt at different temperatures. Several laminators come with preset temperatures, but many higher-end laminators come with a fully variable temperature control.

4. What Is The Purpose of the Speed Controller?

Speed control is another way to help control the quality of the laminated product. Some films, in conjunction with temperature control, need the speed to be adjusted for optimal quality.

5. What Mil Thickness Is Best to Use?

The mil thickness used depends entirely on what you will be laminating and how rigid you want the end result to be. If you are laminating cardstock, thicker film may not be required. If you are laminating 20-pound paper, you may want some lamination film that is a little thicker. One of the most common lamination film thicknesses purchased is 5mil.

6. After I run Something Through the Laminator, What Does it Mean When the Film is Cloudy?

If the lamination film is cloudy, you are running your laminator too cold and need to increase the temperature. The cloudiness is un-melted film.

7. What Causes Lamination Film to Ripple?

If the film is rippling, your laminator is running too hot. Turn down the laminator temperature. That should eliminate the ripples.

8. What Does it Mean if the Film has Bubbles?

If the film has bubbles, the laminator is running too hot. If the laminator is too hot, the film can boil and bubble. Turn down the laminator temperature. This should eliminate the problem.

 

 

What should you look for in a good pouch laminator?

Wednesday, November 4th, 2009

Pouch laminators are still widely used because they provide an affordable and effective way to protect documents. Pouch lamination film can be used to coat business cards, menus, photographs, important documents and more. Although lamination film has remained relatively the same for 10+ years, the equipment has progressed significantly during that same period of time. Here are a few tips on what to look for in a pouch laminator.

Rollers – All pouch laminators have at least a minimum of 2 rollers, one on top and the other on the bottom. Higher-end laminators will often come with more rollers. Many medium and high-volume laminators have 4 rollers. Photograph laminators will sometimes feature 6 to 8 rollers. The more rollers present, the more evenly pressure and heat are distributed.

Variable Temperature – Different thicknesses of film require different temperatures. Having a variable temperature control allows the operator to select exactly what is needed for the film being used. Many laminators have a simple toggle switch (5m, 7m or 10m) that will cool down or heat up the laminator. Many higher end laminators use a dial for precise degree adjustments.

Thermometer – This feature is not a necessity for most users, but if an object being laminated is temperature sensitive, or if the film being used requires a specific temperature, a thermometer is ideal to have.

Reverse Button – A reverse button is especially nice to have if you are concerned about jams. When laminating a document with little clearance (left or right), a reverse switch gives the user peace of mind. I personally like to have a reverse button on my laminator.

Motor & Heat Controls – Many laminators have a single button to turn on the motor and heat. This is fine if you are laminating a few items, but if you are laminating a lot of documents you will probably want to get a laminator with a separate button for the motor and the heat. This allows you to keep the laminator warm without having the motor on 100 percent of the time. This helps save energy and prolongs the life of the laminator.

While these are all great things to keep in mind while looking for a laminator, you can learn even more by reading ABC Office’s laminator guide here. You can also find our entire selection of pouch laminators here.

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