Using a Bill Counter as a Check Counting Machine

Bill Counters as Check CountersI recently had a customer call up and ask me what we recommended he use for counting checks. He apparently ran a business and was in a situation where he needed to count the total number of checks at the end of the day. He didn’t need anything too robust and was only dealing with a few hundred checks a day. Luckily the solution to his problem was actually pretty simple. I recommended he use a bill counter (found here). Here’s why.

Bill counters are far simpler than the name implies. These devices are designed to quickly count up the total number of bills. They don’t provide a total denominational value, making these perfect for counting non-currency items as well. In fact, we have many customers that use a standard bill counter to count paper, checks, coupons and other paper-based materials. There are a few things to keep in mind, however, before simply going out and buying a machine.

In this customer’s situation, he didn’t need counterfeit detection or any special whistles and bells with a device. He simply needed the total number. This ended up saving him money because I was able to set him up with a basic but high quality system. He ended up going with the ABC1150 bill counter (found here).

So are these machines accurate? You bet. They are 100 percent accurate and most have safeguards in place in case multiple pieces are pulled through or if a jam occurs. I have personally tested many of our bill counters by running the same stack through multiple times. I have never had a bill counter register a different amount during a repeated counting. These are accurate and you won’t have a problem with a misread.

There are a few things you need to keep your eye open for when dealing with bill counters counting non-money items. The first thing you need to be aware of is that these bill counters have a maximum and minimum bill size. Be sure your check, paper or whatever items you are counting fall within those minimum and maximum dimensions. In the case of the ABC1150, it can handle bills as small as 2″ x 4″ or as large as 4″ x 7 1/3″.

Also be aware that our bill counters use friction to pull the paper in and count it. That means if the paper you need to count is glossy or slick, there may be a problem. This is because the friction rollers may slip on the glossy surface, resulting in a jam. This is the case with most office machinery that uses friction-based rubber rollers.

So is there a particular brand you should stick with if you are counting checks? I have always had excellent luck with Semacon, Cassida, Carnation and the ABC line of bill counters.

We have a lot of these bill counters out on our showroom floor. If you’re not sure if a bill counter will work for your check, paper, coupon or other counting project, feel free to send in some samples and we can have them tested to ensure proper operation prior to a purchase. We also have an experienced team that is very knowledgeable with our bill counters. Feel free to call and talk with them by calling 1-800-658-8788.

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