What Makes the Triumph 4305 Paper Cutter so Good?

Triumph 4305 Stack CutterWhen it comes to manual stack paper cutters, very few even come close to holding a candle next to the MBM Triumph 4305 stack cutter (found here). This cutter is a third generation manual stack cutter, with its roots coming from the Triumph 3905 and Triumph 4205. There are many reasons why this cutter is considered to be one of the best and I would like to cover those features in this article.

First off, I would like to go on record saying that I have personally used this cutter. I have used it to cut stacks of standard 20# copy paper (hundreds at a time) to create notepads and business cards here in the office. While this is a manual paper cutter, I would argue that you can cut paper just as fast using this machine than an electric powered machine.

When you remove the top cover to this cutter, and compare the internal workings to other knockoffs, you really see the quality difference. There is a refinement, quality and build in this German paper cutter that you simply don’t find in other cutters. Other cutters appear to have been slapped together and grease slopped in during assembly. I have even seen circlips missing on knockoff cutters. The Triumph cutters are well put together and clearly high-end quality control measures are in place. For whatever reason, German paper cutters are the best…bar none.

What I find most remarkable about the Triumph 4305 is just how easy and how little manual effort you have to put into using this cutter. I have used other cutters where you almost had to hang on the handle and use all of your weight to cut through a stack. The triumph 4305 can cut through 1 ½” of paper in a single pass. This cutter is so beautifully geared that I can cut a stack of paper using a single finger, literally. Trust me, I’ve tried it. Don’t feel intimidated by this cutter.

The manual clamp on this cutter holds paper in place nicely. If you are cutting slick, glossy or coated paper, you may need to go with the Triumph 4705 (found here) as the slick paper may shift a little if the clamp isn’t securely in place. The spinning “hatch” style clamp on the 4705 is pretty much fool proof. That said, I think the Triumph 4305’s clamp is more than adequate for most jobs.

The backstop is very fine, although it is analog. The front hand crank is turned clockwise to bring the backstop forward and counterclockwise (anticlockwise) to take it back. A ruler on the side with an arrow lets you know exactly where the backstop is located. If this isn’t enough refinement for you, it also includes an optical cutting line (laser tool) that shines across the paper to let you know exactly where the blade will come down. Unless you need micrometer level measurements, I really thing this cutter is more than adequate for measuring in a cut. The backstop handcrank can be pulled forward and be disabled to prevent accidental backstop adjustments.

The cutting blade on this cutter is made from heavy duty forged Solingen steel. You can read more about Solingen steel by going here. The blade holds its edge like a razor and can be re-sharpened anywhere from 2-3 times (depending on wear and tear). The blade rests into a cutting stick. With the older models, such as the 3905, you had to fish the cutting stick out. With the new design, the cutting stick conveniently pulls out of the side.

As of this article, the MBM Triumph 4305 (by Ideal) includes the cutting stand. This option comes and goes, but is certainly something to keep your eye open for. In conclusion, I have to say that this is a great cutter. Does it cost more than many other cutters? Yes, but it will outlast those other cutters by years (literally).

Please feel free to give us a call at 1-800-658-8788 with any stack cutter questions. You can find the Triumph 4305 here  and our entire selection of stack cutters here.

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