Posts Tagged ‘Coil Binding’

Akiles iCoil 41+ Spiral Binding Machine Review

Thursday, May 21st, 2015
The Akiles iCoil 41+ spiral binder comes loaded with several features

The Akiles iCoil 41+ Spiral Binding Machine

 

 

Coil Binding’s Full Meal Deal

 

You know how you might enjoy a $5 Buck Lunch at Dairy Queen with a bacon cheeseburger, fries, drink, plus a sundae. Well, the Akiles iCoil 41+ Spiral binding machine draws several similarities. Just like the $5 Buck Lunch is a hearty deal that will keep your belly satisfied for several hours, the iCoil 41+ comes loaded with features not commonly found in a coil binding machine in its class.

 

The iCoil 41+ has a 4:1 pitch hole pattern that produces oval-shaped punched holes. This feature makes it easier to insert/spin the PVC binding coils through the punched pages. Oval-shaped holes also make it easier to turn the pages in a document. They improve the document binding process by as much as 50 percent.

 

The iCoil includes coil crimping pliers, an accessory you typically purchase separately from the coil binding machine. There’s a clever little electric coil inserter that’s concealed under the machine’s lid. This design makes the unit more compact for storage. The anti-dust cover also helps keep the machine interior clean when not in use. The iCoil 41+ has built-in coil measuring guides that enable you to select the correct coil size for the number of pages you are using. The machine’s vertical punching design improves document sheet alignment and reduces punching slip-ups and errors.

 

This coil binder by Akiles has an ergonomically designed punch handle that provides almost effortless punching. There’s also an electric foot pedal to activate the electric coil inserter. This makes coil binding fast and easy.

 

You will simplify your coil binding work with the Akiles iCoil Plus. This convenient and compact coil binding system gets the job done quickly and efficiently. Be sure to contact ABC Office today for more details about the Akiles iCoil 41+ Spiral Binding Machine.

 

Tamerica Optimus-46i Coil Binding Machine Review

Monday, May 18th, 2015
coil binder, coil binding, 4:1 pitch, coil punch, oval holes

The Optimus-46i

The Tamerica Optimus-46i Coil Binding machine is an impressive little model that’s affordably priced. You typically find machines with its capabilities in the $400-$700 price tag range.

The Optimus-46i has fully disengageable punch pins.  This allows you to punch and bind a wide variety of documents of different sizes. The pull-out punch pins help you avoid unseemly half-punched papers.

The coil inserter located on the top of the machine offers a new and innovative twist to document binding. It features a grooved silicone roller that makes it smoother and simpler to insert the PVC coil into a punched stack of paper.

The Optimus-46i from Tamerica offers further simplicity and efficiency with its foot-operated pedal. This operates the machine’s punch dies, or pins. This added feature alone helps free up your hands and improves your productivity.

There are also other useful features including oval punched holes — this makes it much easier to insert coil. There’s adjustable depth control and you can punch up to 20 sheets of copy paper at a time.

Be sure to contact ABC Office today to learn more about the Tamerica Optimus-46i Coil Binding Machine.

 

Rebinding Old Paperback Books With Comb or Coil

Wednesday, February 23rd, 2011

Rebinding Paperback BooksYou’re probably seen them at the library or on your own bookshelf at home, old tattered paperback books that are beginning to lose pages. These beat up books often end up in the garbage, deemed by the owner to be too far beyond repair. It is possible, however, to breath life back into those old paperback books. I will explain how.

The reason I am writing about rebinding paperback books is due to a conversation I had with a customer. They were looking to rebind old paperback books. They wanted to do this as part of a business. Here are the steps I explained to the customer, which you can use, to rebind a paperback book.

Paperback books are bound using a method referred to as perfect binding. Essentially the pages of the book are run through a machine that applies glue to the backside (spine) of the paper. These pages then rest on a cover that is then wrapped around the book.

Rebinding paperback books using perfect binding is cost prohibitive. This is why comb and coil have become the binding formats of choice when it comes to rebinding paperback books. The method (comb or coil) will depend on personal preference. Comb biding and coil binding are usually chosen for rebinding due to their durability. Both plastic comb and PVC coil are next to indestructible.

Paperback Rebinding Steps

  1. Coil BindingFirst you’re going to want to cut off the old tattered spine of the paperback book. This is usually done by using a stack paper cutter. Stack cutters, depending on the model, can slice through ½” to 3″ of paper at a time.
  2. Now that the old spine has been cut off, you will want to begin comb punching or coil punching the paper. If the cover is still good, go ahead and use it. If the front and back covers are beyond repair, you may need to replace them with cover stock.
  3. Once all the holes have been punched, the new binding element may be inserted.
  4. Comb Binding

  5. If you are using comb, use the comb opener to open the comb and insert spine through the now comb-punched pages. Now close the comb. You’re paperback book is now solid again and has a brand new comb spine.
  6. If you are using coil, spin the coil through the punched holes on the paperback book and crimp off the excess coil. You now have a rebound paperback book using coil.

The end results look great. The information in those books is now accessible and easy to read again.

Be aware that I recommend using a book binding machine with disengageable (selectable) punching dies. This helps cut down on half-punched holes and will ultimately result in a better bound paperback book.

You can find our entire selection of comb binding machines here and coil binding machines here. You can find our entire selection of stack paper cutters here. Good luck! I hope you are all able to use this tips to breath new life back into your old books!

Which Is The Best Book Binding Format?

Tuesday, October 19th, 2010

Tamerica VersaBind Book Binding MachineAre you looking for a book binding machine, but have absolutely no idea where to start? Welcome to the club. I’d say at least half of the customers I talk to, who need a binding machine, have no idea where to start. With so many great choices out there, I can’t say I blame you. Here are a few tips on how you can get the best binding machine.

To begin with, there are three main types of binding. These binding formats are comb, wire and coil. Sure there are a few specialized binding formats out there such as Velobind and Proclick, but they don’t even come close to touching the 90% plus market share comb, wire and coil have.

I am going to cover the pros and the cons of all three binding formats. Hopefully, after reading this guide, you will have a better idea as to which binding machine you should get.

Comb, Wire & Coil Pros & Cons

Comb Binding MachinesComb Comb binding is still probably one of the most popular binding formats used today.

  • Pros – Comb binding is the most affordable binding format today. The supplies are very inexpensive. They are available in a wide variety of color, are very durable, allow the operator to add or remove pages and they can be re-used over and over.
  • Cons – Some people think comb binding has a “cheap” look that isn’t adequate for professional repots and presentations. This is a matter of opinion, but something you should take into consideration.

Wire Binding MachinesWireWire binding is one of the most popular binding formats used today for creating presentations and reports. It isn’t uncommon to even find storybooks bound in double-loop wire (aka twin-loop wire).

  • Pros – Wire looks great, plain and simple. When done right, there aren’t any other “element” binding formats that look as professional. Wire comes in a variety of different colors and is available in a 2:1 (two holes per inch) and 3:1 (three holes per inch) hole pattern.
  • Cons – The biggest con with wire is the durability factor. Because the double-loop wire binding elements are made from metal, they can bend. Pages cannot be added or removed with wire.

Coil Binding Machines CoilCoil binding (aka spiral binding) is one of the most popular binding formats used today for creating books, cookbooks, manuals, albums and textbooks.

  • Pros – Coil is probably the most durable binding element around. Made from PVC plastic, coils come in a variety of different colors. One of the biggest benefits of coil is the ability for coil-bound books to open a full 360 degrees. Coil comes in 4:1 (four holes per inch) and 5:1 (five holes per inch) hole patterns.
  • Cons – Coil binding does not allow pages to be added or removed. Coil binding has a slightly longer learning curve due to the use of coil crimping pliers.

So there you have it, the biggest pros and cons with comb, wire and coil binding. You can find our entire selection of book binding machines here. If you’re having trouble settling on any one binding format, we do offer multi-format binding machines found here. Feel free to call us at 1-800-658-8788 with any book binding questions you may have. Happy binding!

Plastic Spiral / Coil Binding Capacity & Diameter Guide

Thursday, August 12th, 2010

Spiral Coil Binding SuppliesMany modern day spiral binding machines feature measurement guides to help determine which diameter coil is needed for a stack of paper. Many machines do not offer this feature though, so here is a quick reference guide to help you estimate how many sheets you can bind with your spiral coils.

Remember, there are two different pitches involved in spiral coil binding. One format is 4:1 pitch (four holes per inch) and the other is 5:1 pitch (five holes per inch). I will provide a quick reference guide for both hole patterns. Be aware that 4:1 pitch coils are available up to 1 ¼-inch (32mm) in diameter and 5:1 pitch is available in sizes up to 13/32-inch (20mm) in diameter.

Spiral Binding Quick Reference Diameter / Capacity Guide

(Based on 20# Paper)

1/4″ (6mm) – 20 Sheets
9/32″ (7mm) – 30 Sheets
5/16″  (8mm) – 40 Sheets
11/32″  (9mm) – 50 Sheets
13/32″ (10mm) – 60 Sheets
7/16″  (11mm) – 70 Sheets
15/32″ (12mm) – 80 Sheets
1/2″ (13mm) – 90 Sheets
9/16″ (14mm) – 100 Sheets
19/32″ (15mm) – 110 Sheets
5/8″ (16mm) – 120 Sheets
11/16″ (18mm) – 138 Sheets
13/16″ (20mm) – 152 Sheets
7/8″ (22mm) – 170 Sheets
1″ (25mm) – 200 Sheets
1 1/8″ (28mm) – 220 Sheets
1 3/16″ (30mm) – 225 Sheets
1 ¼” (32mm) – 230 Sheets

You can find our entire selection of spiral binding coil supplies here. You can also find our spiral coil binding machines here.

Are Spiral and Coil Binding the Same Thing?

Wednesday, February 10th, 2010

Are Spiral and Coil Binding the Same Thing? We get asked this question almost every day. I can completely understand the confusion. There are so many different binding formats out there. The quick answer is that spiral and coil binding are exactly the same. They are just synonyms of each other. Both terms describe the binding element in great detail. I have even heard coil supplies described as spring supplies, due to the look.

I’ve been also been asked, “Isn’t coil binding metal?” Coil / spiral binding supplies can be metal, but for the last 10 years they have been primarily made from PVC plastic. Plastic is easier to work with, more durable and available in multiple colors. The machines we sell are designed for plastic coils.

Many people also get twin-loop wire binding confused with spiral binding. I just spoke with a lady today who said, “Coil bindings are those metal loops with the straight wire going down the center, right?” Twin loop wire binding looks much different than coil binding. You can see the wire binding above.

Hopefully I have helped clarify the definition of coil / spiral binding. You can read more about coil binding by reading our detailed coil-binding guide found here.

ABC Office has added several new "How To" binding equipment guides to its Web Site.

Friday, October 5th, 2007

How To BindWe are always looking at new ways to help educate our customers and help them learn more about the office equipment they are purchasing. Over the past few years we added several product category guides to our Web site loaded with information. You can find those guides by going here:
https://www.abcoffice.com/product_guide.htm.

We have just added three new “How To” guides to our Web site. The “How To” guides are different than the older guides because the offer more detailed information on specific products. The three new guides just added to ABC Office are the How To Comb Bind, How To Wire Bind and How To VeloBind.

Each guide includes detailed information on how to use the binding machines including step-by-step details and also includes links to video demonstrations of the products. You can find the three current “How To” guides here:

How To Comb Bind

How To Wire Bind

How To VeloBind

We plan on adding many more “How To” guides to our Web site over the coming weeks and months. Be sure to come back and check out our new guides!

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