Posts Tagged ‘Food Packaging’

How do grocery stores preserve food?

Friday, March 3rd, 2006

Vacuum SealersHave you ever wondered how food is processed and prepared for the store? It may not be at the top of your list, but it is still very interesting. If proper care is not taken, food can easily spoil. Bacteria sets in and causes the food to rot. Rotten food is both tastes bad and can be dangerous. Rotten food can also cost stores a lot of money in lost merchandise. Several types of food preservation are available to extend shelf life. These preservation methods help eliminate and slow a variety of bacteria, fungus and more.

Salting food used to be widely practiced to help preserve meat. Food was kept outside during cooler times to preserve food. Refrigerators were later introduced to help slow down bacteria. Refrigerators can now be widely found in both stores and homes. Putting all food in refrigerators is expensive and not economical for grocery stores. Due to cost, other methods have been invented to help preserve food. One of the more popular methods is the vacuum sealer.

Vacuum sealers put food in an airtight environment that prevents bacteria and fungus from growing.
Vacuum sealers remove air and seal products in a bag. This eliminates the vital oxygen that most bacteria require to grow. The finished vacuum-sealed bag can then be placed on a shelf, hung on a wall or be put in a refrigerator for superior preservation.

Chamber sealers are one of the more popular vacuum sealers used by commercial producers of food. This style of sealer uses a chamber where the products and bags are placed. Air is removed from the entire chamber, including the bag and food, which creates a vacuum. The bag is sealed and the air inside the chamber is returned back to normal. Because the bag is previously sealed, the air inside the bag remains in a vacuum-like state. You can see an example of this by going here. The demo is pretty fun to watch.

Potato chips and delicate food such as crackers can be damaged if all the air is removed from the vacuum-sealed bag. For this reason, the amount of air removed from the bag can be adjusted. Nitrogen air tanks can be attached to most chamber vacuum sealers, replacing the oxygen with another gas that has better preserving properties. Although some bacteria do not require oxygen to survive, most bacteria are wiped out when the oxygen is swapped out for nitrogen.

You can see ABC Office’s entire selection of vacuum sealers by going here.

What Are Vacuum Sealers and What Do They Do?

Friday, April 1st, 2005

Vacuum SealerWe are proud to announce the addition of chamber vacuum sealers to our line of packaging products. These new chamber vacuum sealers quickly and efficiently package food products in seconds. Vacuum sealers can be used to package a variety of food such as deli meat slices, salmon, green beans, pretzels, potato chips and more. Some people even use vacuum sealers to protect items such as baseball cards and photographs, by preventing water and contaminants from damaging the product.

It is not uncommon to find an inexpensive vacuum sealer at a department store for under $100. Although good for home use, commercial food packagers and grocers do not use these sealers because the take a long time to remove air from a bag and are not designed for high-volume use. High-volume vacuum sealers not only remove air from FDA-approved plastic vacuum bags, but they can also be connected to an optional nitrogen gas line for extended shelf life for potato chips and pretzels.

Vacuum sealers can be set to tightly wrap plastic around a product, or provide a secure and oxygen-free bag for long-term packaging. You can adjust the removed air to be anywhere from one to 99.9 percent. Potato chip manufacturers use a similar process. They will have about 50 to 60 percent of the air removed, and replace the oxygen with nitrogen for extended shelf life. Most of our vacuum sealers are available with a gas-line hookup. Replacing existing air with nitrogen that prevents bacteria, and other contaminants, from growing and keeps the food from spoiling. If you are removing 99.9 percent of the air, nitrogen is not needed. With 99.9 percent of the air removed, bacteria cannot easily grow.

The first step in using a vacuum sealer is to place your product in a bag. The bag is then placed inside the chamber. The top cover of the chamber is then pulled down. Once the air begins to be removed from the chamber, manual pressure on the lid can be removed, as it will stay in place by itself. The chamber then removes the designated amount of air (up to 99.9 percent) from the chamber. The machine then seals the bag shut and returns the chamber air pressure back to normal. The air in the bag is not returned to normal, because it has been sealed. The end result is a properly vacuum-sealed product.

We are continually trying to find products to help make our customers’ daily jobs easier. Our addition of chamber vacuum sealers will help do this. We have created a video demo on our new vacuum sealers. The demo is about 18 minutes long and can be easily viewed by going to this page . High-speed Internet will be required to properly view this video demo.

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