Posts Tagged ‘Spiral Binding Machines’

Everything You Ever Wanted To Know About Coil Binding

Monday, October 22nd, 2012

Coil Binding MachinesSo you’re interested in coil binding, but you have a whole lot of questions that need answering before you make a purchase? That’s OK. When it comes to investing $100s to potentially $1000s of dollars in a binding machine, you should know everything there is to know about the format. I have over a decade of experience with coil binding machines (found here) and I would like to share some of that information with you.

To begin with, coil binding is a book binding format that uses coils (often called spirals) that have a spring-like appearance. Have you ever used a spiral notebook? That is a type of coil binding, which uses metal coils. The binding I am going to talk about in this article is very similar except that it uses PVC plastic coils instead of metal.

Coil binding has some huge perks over other book binding formats. Here are just a few of the reasons coil binding has become so popular over the last few years:

  • Coil BindingPages Lay Flat – Due to the nature of coil binding, coil bound books can be opened and will lay flat on a table. This makes coil binding excellent for instructional information such as manuals and cookbooks.
  • Pages Turn 360 Degrees – That’s right! Pages on a coil bound book will wrap around a full 360 degrees. This is excellent for reading and accessing information. I have a manual for an old 1979 VW diesel rabbit that was coil bound. I loved it because I could turn right to the section I needed, wrapped the page around and laid it on the front of my car while doing automotive work.
  • Durability – Plastic PVC binding coils are extremely durable. In situations where comb would fall apart or wire would bend, PVC binding coils hold up. You can drop coil bound books or step on them and they just seem to hold up.
  • Customization – Plastic PVC coils are available in over a dozen different colors and are available in several different diameters. This makes it possible to bind a book that is just a few pages thick or something that is a hundred pages thick. This customizability makes it possible to bind a book that is unique and classy.
  • Affordability – Plastic binding coils are affordable and readily available.

So what types of coil binding machines are there and which is best for you?

  • Manual Punch Coil Binding Machines (found here) – Manual coil binding machines have a punch that is manually operated. This is usually done via a lever located on the right side of the machine. Manual punch machines usually vary from 10-20 pages per punching pass, depending on the machine. This style of book binding machine is ideal for low to medium-volume book binding.
  • Electric Punch Coil Binding Machines (found here) – Electric punch machines have an electric motor that punches the paper. This requires little manual effort and is ideal when binding a lot of books throughout the day. Most electric punch machines have a food pedal that activates the punch although some use a button and others uses a combination food pedal / switch.
  • Electric Coil Inserters – Some manual and most electric punch machines have what’s known as an electric coil inserter. These inserters are designed to quickly spin coil through pre-punched holes. The process is extremely fast and is far quicker than manually inserting coils.
  • 4:1 Coil Binding Pitch PatternPitch – Coil binding machines come in either 4:1 pitch or 5:1 pitch hole patterns. The pitch is how many holes are punched per inch of paper. This means a 4:1 pitch machine has four holes per inch of paper. Once you purchase a machine 5:1 Pitch Coil Binding Hole Patternwith a punch set in a certain pitch, you need to make sure the supplies (found here) you purchase are the same pitch. Unfortunately 5:1 pitch supplies will not work with a 4:1 pitch machine and vice versa. The 4:1 pitch is the most popular used in the United States.

Which brand should you use? I have used many brands of coil binding machines. Some work better than others and some hold up better than others. From personal experience, I can safely say that personally like Akiles and Intelli-Bind. Both brands are reliable and seem to hold up well with continuous use.

Would you like to see a coil binding machine in use? Here are video demos of manual coil binding machines and electric coil binding machines. These videos should give you a good idea as to how these machines work:

MANUAL COIL BINDING MACHINE

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ELECTRIC COIL BINDING MACHINE

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You can find our entire selection of coil binding machines here and coil binding supplies here. We also have a great step-by-step guide on how to use a coil binding machine that you can find here.

If you still have questions about coil binding, please feel free to give us a call at 1-800-658-8788. We have over 30 years of experience with coil binding and would love to help point you in the right direction.

Top 8 Best Manual Coil Binding Machines

Thursday, March 15th, 2012

Intelli-Bind IC410 Manual Coil Binding MachineThe hottest type of binding for 2012 is coil binding (found here). This versatile and easy-to-use binding format can be used to bind presentations, cookbooks, reports, manuals and more. While this all sounds great, which machine should you use for your own coil binding operations? There are a lot of machines out there. Some of them are garbage and others are diamonds in the rough. Which machine should you use? I would like to visit 8 machines that have a great reputation with our customers.

Coil binding, often referred to as spiral binding, is a way to bind pages of paper together using spring-like PVC plastic coil binding elements. These coils spin through punched holes in the paper. Once the coils have been spun through the holes, the ends are cut and crimped off using a tool called coil-crimping pliers. The entire process takes just a few seconds to a few minutes, depending on the experience level of the operator.

There are many reasons people choose coil over wire or comb. To begin with, pages bound in coil can turn a full 360 degrees. This makes access to bound literature extremely easy. This binding format also allows books to lay flat open on a table or surface. This again makes reading and handling easy.

Akiles iCoil 41+ Coil Binding MachineCoil binding comes in two different hole patterns. The hole pattern is referred to as the pitch. A 4:1 pitch coil binding machine punches 4 holes per inch of paper and a 5:1 pitch coil binding machine punches 5 holes per inch of paper. The 4:1 pitch can bind more paper than the 5:1 pitch as the holes are spaced farther apart. If you don’t plan on binding more than about an inch of paper, either hole pattern will work for you (matter of preference). Once you settle on a hole pattern, you will need to be sure the supplies you buy match up with the hole pattern of your machine.

So which machines should you consider buying? I will list of 8 best sellers, but first I would like to familiarize you with a few reliable brands. If you’re shopping for a machine, consider a brand like Akiles, Tamerica, Intelli-Bind or Renz. These four brands are solid machines.

These 8 machines are what are known as manual coil binding machines. This means the punching is done by manually pulling a handle. The coil insertion process, however, is often still done with an electric motor while still being called a “manual” machine. Without further wait, here is my list.

Top 8 Best Manual Coil Binding Machines (Sorted by lowest to highest price)

I have hands-one experience with each of these machines. They’re solid. You won’t be disappointed. That said, you should still get a machine that is appropriate for the amount of books you are binding per day. If you would like to bind several hundred books a day, you may still want to  consider going with an electric coil binding machine (found here). Electric punches help speed up the process and require less manual effort to bind a book.

At ABC Office we offer a huge selection of coil binding machines (found here) and coil binding supplies (found here). We have been selling coil binding machines for over 30 years and have the experience and the knowledge to help you find a good machine. Please feel free to call us at 1-800-658-8788 with any questions.

Why You May Want to Use Coil Binding

Friday, October 14th, 2011

Coil BindingAre you binding a cookbook, an instruction manual or perhaps even a photo album? One book binding format you should consider using is coil binding. Coil binding, often referred to as spiral binding, is the fastest growing binding format today. There are many reasons for this and I would like to cover all the pros and cons. I would also like to show you, with a video, how a coil binding machine works.

Coil binding is a format that uses tiny coils that look a lot like springs (found here). Other than the fact that coil binding coils are made from PVC plastic, they look almost identical to the spirals used in traditional spiral notebooks. PVC coils are available in different diameters, based on the thickness of the book you are binding, and come in a wide range of colors.

I personally think that coil binding looks very professional. I have personally used coil binding to bind instructional booklets and I have in my possession several cookbooks (family and neighborhood) that are bound in coil. Coil binding machines are affordable and can even be used at home. Popular brands include Akiles, Intelli-Bind and Tamerica.

Coil Binding MachinesI would like to now go over the pros:

  • Durability – Because coil-binding elements are made from PVC plastic, they are extremely durable. The hold up well with continued use, easily survive being dropped and can even be stepped on without suffering any damage. Durability alone is a huge reason to consider using coil binding.
  • Color – I have already mentioned this earlier, but coil binding comes in a variety of different colors. Popular colors include red, white, brown, green, blue, black and clear.  Custom colors are also available.
  • Page Turns – A book bound in coil is extremely easy to use. The round holds, combined with round-shaped elements, make page turns extremely easy. Pages can be wrapped around a full 360 degrees and pages lay extremely flat.
  • Speed – Binding a book with coil is extremely easy, especially if you have a machine that has an electric coil inserter. Simply punch the holes, insert the coils and crimp off the excess coil.

These are what I would consider to be the cons:

  • Modifications – You cannot add or remove pages to a coil bound document without cutting off the end of the coil and spinning the coil back out. The coil cannot be re-used. If you are removing or adding pages, a new coil would have to be used. On the bright side, this makes coil binding semi tamper proof.
  • Stability – Because coils are floppy and unstable, they don’t provide a lot of added stability to a book like comb or Velobind does. Your books stability is dependent entirely on the pages being bound. This isn’t a huge deal for most people.

Here is a video demo of a coil binding machine in use:

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In conclusion, coil binding is one of my favorite formats. It looks good, is functional and can be used for binding books as simple as a cookbook or as professional as a business proposal. You will find coil binding machines in schools, churches, homes and businesses.

You can find our entire selection of coil binding machines here. Please feel free to call us at 1-800-658-8788 with any questions.

4:1 Pitch PVC Spiral Binding Coils

Wednesday, June 29th, 2011

4:1 Pitch Coil Binding MachinesCoil binding looks good. It’s classy, can be used to bind a wide range of documents and is extremely functional. Coil binding (aka Spiral Binding) is available in two different hole patterns. These are 4:1 pitch (four holes per inch) and 5:1 pitch (five holes per inch). Four-to-one pitch coil is the most popular format used. Why is this? I’ll explain.

Let me go into a few more details about specifically what the differences are between 4:1 pitch and 5:1 pitch coil. I’ll start off with 4:1 pitch coil.

4:1 Pitch Coil Supplies4:1 Pitch Coils (0.25″) – When used on 11″ paper, you typically end up with a total of 43 to 44 holes, depending on how the punching die is aligned. Outside the United States, this pattern is referred to as a 6mm hole pattern. Supplies are available in diameters ranging from ¼” (6mm) up to 1 ¼” (32mm). Some larger diameter coils are available, but less common.

5:1 Pitch Coil Hole Pattern5:1 Pitch Coils – This hole pattern produces about 54-55 holes along the 11″ side of a sheet of paper. Outside the United States this is known as a 5mm hole pattern. Supplies are available in diameters ranging from ¼” (6mm) up to 13/16″ (20mm). While some larger diameter coils are available, they are generally not used or recommended due to the tight hole alignment of the 5:1 pitch pattern.

So why is 4:1 pitch more popular?
The 4:1 pitch hole pattern is more widely used because it can be used to bind more paper. The wider gap in the holes makes it possible to bind thicker books without the pages binding together (easier page turns).

Which hole pattern should you use? The hole pattern you use will depend on personal preference and functionality. If you like the tighter hole pattern, and are aware of the 13/16″ diameter limitation, you may want to consider a 5:1 pitch pattern. If you are unsure and don’t have a preference, 4:1 pitch is more versatile and more common.

Oval or Round?
– Akiles, one of the best-known manufacturers of coil binding machines, recently released a 4:1 Plus pitch hole pattern (0.248″). These holes are oval in shape. The advantage to the oval shape is that coil supplies are supposed to more easily spin through the holes. While they may be easier for coil insertion, you probably won’t notice a huge difference.

Metal or PVC? While you can buy spiral notebooks that are bound using metal coils, in-house coil binding is done by using spiral PVC coils. PVC coils are now the most prominent and widely used supply used for coil binding. PVC coils are popular because they are available in a wide range of colors, are extremely durable and are easier for use with a spiral binding machine.

I hope this helps clarify coil binding for you. If you still have questions, please feel free to call one of our book binding specialist at 1-800-658-8788.

You can find our entire selection of coil binding machines here and our entire selection of coil binding supplies here.

Features To Look For In A Coil Binding Machine

Friday, February 25th, 2011

Coil Binding MachinesCoil binding is increasingly becoming one of the most preferred book binding formats a available. Sometimes referred to as spiral binding, coil bound books are durable, pages turn a full 360 degrees and coil binding can be used to bind reports, presentations, booklets and more. So what features should you look for in a coil binding machine? Here are some tips that should point you in the right direction.

Features To Look For In A Coil Binding Machine

  1. Machine Pitch – The pitch of a binding machine is the hole pattern that particular machine uses. Coil binding is available in two different hole patters. These are 4:1 pitch and 5:1 pitch. The “pitch” you choose will depend on the hole spacing you like and the thickness of your book. Once you select a hole pattern, you will need to be sure you use supplies with the same hole configuration.
  2. Round or Oval – While round holes are by far the most common available for coil binding, some newer Akiles machines now feature oval holes. Oval holes are supposed to make coil insertion and page turns a little easier.
  3. Book Thickness – How thick a book will you need to bind? A 4:1 pitch can bind a book up to about 1 ¼” of paper where a 5:1 pitch binds a book up to about 13/16″ thick.
  4. Page Size – Most coil binding machines are used to bind letter-size paper. Some machines, however, can bind legal size and larger documents. Be sure to check the maximum page length of a machine before making a purchase. Some coil binding machines are open ended, which means you can punch paper, slide it over and punch it again.
  5. Margin Depth – If you are binding books of varying thicknesses, you may need a machine with an adjustable margin depth. I have found with coil binding (versus wire or coil), margin depth isn’t quiet as big a deal. This is because there are more holes, providing more stability to the bind. An adjustable margin depth is nice, however, if you are binding thick books. Punching deeper into the paper should help prevent pages from accidentally tearing out.
  6. Disengageable Punching Pins – While most people bind  8 ½” x 11″ books with coil, some of you may want to bind a custom cookbook or booklet. If you are binding odd-size paper, a disengageable punching pin will help you to disable dies that may otherwise punch a half hole on the edge of the document.
  7. Machine Construction – As with most binding machines, you will usually find coil binders made from plastic, aluminum, steel or a combination thereof. Build quality will affect the longevity of your machine. Steel will last longer and is best for high-volume binding. Aluminum and plastic components are better for light to medium-volume binding. Some machines feature steel gears and components with a plastic shell. Looks can be deceiving.
  8. Electric Inserter – Electric coil inserters are rubber wheels or rollers that are used to spin coils through punched paper. About 65-70% of the machines out there feature an electric coil inserter. While you can manually insert coils through punched holes, an inserter can quadruple (or more) coil insertion speed. I personally love having an electric inserter.
  9. Coil Pliers – Be aware that you will need coil-crimping pliers to finish the coil binding process. Many machines come with pliers, but an equal number don’t. Be sure to check whether or not your machine comes with pliers. If your machine doesn’t have crimping pliers, they can be purchased separately. I have even heard of people using wire snips to cut and crimp coil.
  10. Electric & Manual Punch – Coil binding machines come with manual and electric punches. The style of punch you use will depend on preference, budget and output capacity. If you are binding high-volume amounts of books, you may want to consider using an electric punch. If you are only binding a few dozen a day, a manual punch should be more than enough.
  11. Foot Pedals – Foot pedals, whether for an electric inserter or paper punch, allow for hands-free operation. Hands-free operation is awesome when you are binding a lot of books per day.

You can find our entire selection of coil binding machine here and coil binding supplies here. Feel free to speak with one of our coil binding experts by calling us at 1-800-658-8788.

How To Choose The Right Coil Binding Machine

Monday, February 14th, 2011

Coil Binding SuppliesCoil binding is considered by many people, professionals and businesses to be one of the most versatile book binding formats available. There are many reasons for this. Here are just a few of the most common reasons I hear from our customers:

  1. Plastic PVC coils are durable.
  2. Pages turn 360 degrees.
  3. Coil bound documents look professional.
  4. Coils are available in several different colors and sizes.
  5. Coil binding machines are very affordable.
  6. Coil binding is great for binding cookbooks, reports, presentations and other documents.

Now that we have established that coil binding is pretty nice, there are a few things you should ask yourself prior to buying a machine. Answers to these questions should help you find the right machine that will work for you.

Coil Binding Questions

  • How many books will you be binding per day? The amount of books you bind per day will determine whether you need a manual punch or an electric punch. Electric punch machines are ideal for runs of several dozen to several hundred books. Manual punches are fine for a few to a few dozen books a day.
  • What size are the books you will be binding? How big is the book you will be binding. Most coil binding machines have at least a 12″ binding width, however, some can bind legal size 14″ documents. Also, if you are binding smaller books you may want to consider getting a machine with disengageable punching pins. This will allow you to bind a wide variety of custom-size books.
  • How thick will be books be that you are binding? If you will be binding a book about ¼” thick, most machines will work for you. If you will be binding thicker books, you may want to consider using a machine with an adjustable margin depth. This allows you to punch deeper into a sheet of paper, depending on the thickness of the book. This will help cut down on pages inadvertently tearing out.
  • Which hole binding pitch / pattern do you prefer? Coil binding supplies comes in 4:1 pitch and 5:1 pitch patters. This is 4 holes per inch (4:1) and 5 holes per inch (5:1). Different pitches / hole patterns create different appearances. The 4:1 pitch pattern can bind more paper than a 5:1 pitch.
  • Where will you be using your binding machine? Keep in mind how big the machine is. Be sure the desk or table you are using can accommodate both the size and the weight of the machine.
  • Do you need an electric coil inserter? Coil binding machines come with and without electric coil inserters, depending on the design. If your machine does not have an electric coil inserter, you will need to insert the coils by hand. If you are only binding a few to a dozen books a day, this isn’t a big deal. If you are binding several dozen to hundreds of books a day, I highly  recommend getting a machine with an electric coil inserter.

Answers to these questions should help you track down the right machine. I understand that you may still have some important questions. Please feel free to post your questions here and I will try to answer them. You may also call us at 1-800-658-8788 to speak with one of our coil binding experts.

You can find our entire selection of coil binding machines here.

Akiles CoilMac-EPI Electric Coil Binding Machine Review

Wednesday, February 9th, 2011

Akiles CoilMac-EPI Electric Coil Binding MachineAre you in need of a strong, durable and confident coil binding machine? Are you binding dozens to perhaps even hundreds of books a day? You’re going to need a machine designed for continuous use. One great machine I would recommend you to consider is the Akiles CoilMac-EPI electric coil binding machine (found here). I have used this machine many times and this is my review.

The CoilMac-EPI is one of Akiles’ most popular coil binding machines. It punches paper in a 4:1 pitch (0.250″), which is 4 holes per inch. This is the most popular coil binding pitch and allows you to bind books, reports, presentations, cookbooks and more.

The first thing I would like to point out is the build quality of the CoilMac-EPI. This machine is all metal. The punching pins, base, handle and gears are all metal. This is what allows the CoilMac-EPI to hold up so well with continuous use throughout the day. We have sold several of these machines. Once they leave our building, I never hear back from the customer.

The Akiles CoilMac-EPI is an electric coil binding machine. It has an electric paper punch capable of punching through up to 25 sheets of paper at a time. This is impressive for any binding machine. The process takes just seconds. The CoilMac-EPI includes a foot pedal. I personally like this feature because it allows you to hold the paper with both hands while activating the punch. This keeps alignment in check and produces beautiful results.

Once paper is punched, the built in motor spins coils through the punched holes. Unlike many machines out there that have electric coil inserters, the CoilMac-EPI utilizes an industrial-grade roller motor. This means it will hold up with continuous use throughout the day. Did I mention this machine is a high-quality product?

The CoilMac-EPI has a 13″ wide punching length. Because it is open ended, you can use this machine to punch paper up to 26” wide. Several of the punching dies on this coil binder are disengageable (total of 5).

Akiles states that the CoilMac-EPI is manufactured under ISO9001 & 14001 guidelines for highest quality control & environmental management standards.

I can’t even begin to express how much I like this machine. It is a high-quality piece of machinery and you will not be disappointed in it. I rate this machine a solid 5 out of 5 stars. It is perfect for use in any office, bindery or copy center.

You can find the Akiles CoilMac-EPI electric coil binding machine here and our entire selection of coil binding machines here. Feel free to call us at 1-800-658-8788 with any questions.

How To Use A Coil Binding Machine To Bind Books

Thursday, October 14th, 2010

Spiral & Coil Binding MachinesHave you lost your coil binding manual or do you simply want to learn more about how to use a coil binding machine? You’re in luck. This guide will teach you how to use a coil binding machine in 7 easy steps.

Coil binding ranks as one of the top three most popular binding formats used today. This is due to a lot of reasons. A few I can name off the top of my head include the durability of coils, the wide color selection, the price and the ability for the pages to turn a full 360 degrees.

As previously mentioned, I have created a guide that goes through step-by-step instructions on how to coil bind a book. Sure not all coil binding machines work the same, but most are based on similar concepts and functionality. Once you know how to use one coil binding machine, you will probably be able to easily use another.

Coil Bind A Book In 7 Easy Steps

Step 1. The first thing you’ll need to do is set up your machine. This may involve adjusting the edge guide, the margin depth or the selectable punching pins (if equipped).

Coil Binding Machine

Step 2. Gather all the pages you intend to bind. This includes the content, a back sheet and a cover sheet.

Coil Binding Step 2

Step 3. Grab the first few sheets to punch, keeping in mind the maximum punching capacity of your binding machine.

Coil Binding Step 3

Step 4. Now punch the paper and repeat this process until all the pages in your book have been punched.

Coil Binding Step 4

Step 5. Now take your punched paper and make sure the holes are all properly aligned.

Coil Binding Step 5

Step 6. At this point you will want to insert a coil through the first three to four holes. If you have an electric coil inserter, you can now insert the coil the rest of the way. If you don’t have an electric inserter, manually spin the coil the rest of the way through the holes.

Coil Binding Step 6

Step 7. Now take your coil crimping pliers and crimp / cut off the excess coil on both ends of the book. This will keep the coils from spinning back out. You are now done and ready to bind another book!

Coil Binding Step 7

Simple, right? You bet. Using a coil binding machine is quick, affordable and it looks great. You can find our entire selection of coil binding machines here and coil binding supplies here. Do you still have questions about coil binding machines? Contact one of our binding specialists at 1-800-658-8788 with all your questions.

Which Is Best? 5:1 or 4:1 Pitch Spiral Coils

Wednesday, July 28th, 2010

Intelli-Bind IC310 Spiral / Coil Binding MachineI spoke to a customer today who wanted to buy a spiral binding machine, but had no idea which hole pattern to go with. He asked me, “Should I go with 5:1 or 4:1 spirals?” I went over a few of the pros and cons with him. Here is a summary of my response.

First of all, once you choose a hole pattern, you have to stick with it. A 4:1 pitch machine cannot use 5:1 pitch coils and vice versa. There are machines out there that can punch both types of holes, made by Akiles, but this is the exception, not the norm.

I personally think both types of spiral binding look great, but here is what you will want to consider prior to making a purchase:

4:1 Pitch Spiral Coil Hole Pattern4:1 Spirals / Coils – The 4:1 pitch hole pattern is currently the most common and popular hole pattern used today. This equals four holes punched per inch of paper.  A 4:1 pitch spiral binding machine can typically bind up to 1 ¼-inches of paper, which is pretty significant. These types of spirals are available in a wide variety of colors and are used to bind reports, booklets, presentations and more.

5:1 Pitch Spiral Coil Hole Pattern5:1 Spirals / Coils – The 5:1 pitch hole pattern is less common. Some people like this. I have had many customers tell me that they prefer the “tighter” look of a 5:1 pitch. This hole pattern equals five holes per inch of paper. A 5:1 pitch spiral pattern can bind up to 13/16-inch of paper. Because the holes are closer together, the 5:1 cannot bind as many sheets as the 4:1 pitch hole pattern.

While more machines are made in a 4:1 pitch hole pattern, you can still easily find 5:1 pitch machines. You can find our entire selection of spiral / coil binding machines here. You can find our entire selection of spiral coil supplies here.

Oval Holes vs Round Holes in Coil Binding Machines

Tuesday, July 20th, 2010

Round and Oval Coil Binding Hole PatternsCoil binding is one of the most well rounded binding formats that can be used to bind books, reports, manuals, textbooks, albums and much more. Coil binding machines are now available with round holes and oval holes. So which hole pattern is best for you?

Most coil binding machines (aka spiral binding) are made with round-hole punches. This format has been around for some time and is still the preferred binding format used by most manufacturers.

To date, the oval hole pattern is only used by Akiles. The oval hole pattern can be found in the “PLUS” version of Akiles coil binding machines called the CoilMac. The oval hole pattern is supposed to make it easier for pages to turn and easier to insert coils.

Akiles specifically states this regarding their “PLUS” oval hole pattern:

This revolutionary 0.248″ coil pitch is specifically designed to give you 44 evenly-centered holes in an 11″ sheet, which provides the most ideal hole to edge-of-sheet margins and easier coil insertion. Hole pattern is 100% compatible with STANDARD 4:1 pitch coils.

The oval hole pattern uses a 4:1 pitch (0.248″) pattern versus the standard round hole 4:1 Pitch (0.250″) pattern. All 4:1 pitch coils (four holes per inch) can be universally used with round or oval holes without any compatibility issues.

Ultimately the machine you decide to go with is up to you. I don’t personally have a preference between either hole pattern.

You can find our entire selection of coil binding machines here. You can find our entire selection of coil binding supplies here.

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