Posts Tagged ‘Thermal Binding Machines’

Tape Binding or Thermal Binding? Which is Better?

Wednesday, May 11th, 2011

Thermal Binding MachinesIf you’re in the market for a binding machine, you may have come across thermal and tape binding. I find that many customers that are torn between the two formats, with both typically producing similar end results. If presented with both formats, I would personally go with a thermal binding machine. I’ll explain why.

To begin with, let me explain what thermal and tap binding involves:

Tape Binding
– Tape binding typically involves a strip of tape lined with some sort of pressure sensitive adhesive or heat-activated adhesive. This tape is typically applied to the spine of a stack of paper. Most tape-bound documents utilize some sort of clear cover and card stock back cover. While some tape binding machines can bind thicker books, this format is usually used for thinner reports and presentations.

Thermal Binding – Thermal binding machines use special covers, typically a clear cover front and a card stock back, that includes some sort of heat-activated clue in the spine. Paper is placed in the pre-made cover, after which the cover is placed in a machine that heats the glue. Once the hot glue has absorbed into the paper, the cover is removed and the glue solidifies. This type of binding is especially popular for reports and presentations.

Having used both binding formats myself, I can attest to the fact that the end results are almost identical. So why do I like thermal binding machines more? It all has to do with the longevity of the bind.

Tape binding, after a duration of time, will begin to lose pages. This is because, in most cases, the tape adhesive begins to dry out and crack. Because the tape is only sticking to the back spine of the paper, pages begin to loosen and fall out. Continuous use helps prolong this problem.

I remember years ago we offered a tape binding machine called the Report Master. I remember customers calling up complaining that literally after a few weeks to a few months pages would start falling out. I now tell customers that tape binding is intended for temporary use.

Thermal binding, on the other hand, uses glue that absorbs much farther into the paper than tape. As a result, thermal bound documents last much longer. Fellowes makes a line of thermal binding machines called “Helios” that use pre-made covers with glue in the spine, much like I described earlier.

In conclusion, I have to say that both binding formats look great, but ultimately I would go with a thermal binding machine. You can find our thermal binding machines here.

If you don’t mind the involvement of a thermal binding strip, comb, wire, coil and Velobind will all last longer than either thermal or tape. You can find our comb, wire, coil and VeloBind machines here.

Best Binding Machines For College Reports

Friday, February 4th, 2011

College Report Binding MachinesCollege is all about studying, essays, reports, tests and presentations.  Perhaps it was just my degree, but I recall handing in at least one or more reports a week. While ultimately the content of your presentation should be what’s most important, looks often mean everything. First impressions mean a lot and this applies to college as well.

I remember heading over to the local copy shop and binding my college presentations and reports. They looked good, however, I had no idea what I was doing. Little did I know back then that I would end working in the binding industry.

There are about six different styles of book binding that I can think of that were commonly used for binding reports back in the day. These same six binding styles are still commonly used today. They are not only used for binding college reports, but also for binding business presentations.

The six binding styles I am referring to are comb, wire, coil, VeloBind, tape and thermal. Each of these binding formats has their benefits. I’ll cover the benefits (and the weaknesses) of each. I’ll rate these starting with my favorites.

  1. Wire Binding – This is probably my favorite binding format for college reports. Double loop wire binding looks classy, professional and keeps things together. I personally like to use a clear cover for the front, cardstock for the back and wire as the binding element. The only downside to wire is that it can bend.
  2. Coil Binding – Coil binding is durable, long lasting and colorful. This binding style allows pages to turn a full 3six0 degrees and pages can lay flat. Coil binding is great for cookbooks, albums and presentations. The only downside is that the coil ends can be a little difficult (initially) to crimp off. Once you know what you’re doing, however, it’s pretty easy.
  3. VeloBind – VeloBind looks great. The thin ¼” wide binding strip makes presentations look like they were bound in a professional bindery. This binding format is tamper proof and long lasting. The only downside is that pages in thicker reports may be difficult to keep open. These books won’t lie flat.
  4. Comb Binding – Comb binding is probably the most affordable binding format around. The spines are cheap. While I consider comb binding to be the best format for grade school level education, many people think it doesn’t look professional enough for a college-level report.
  5. Thermal Binding – Thermal binding usually involves some sort of glue in a pre-made binding cover. I really like the look of this style of binding. Thermal covers usually involve a clear cover with a cardstock backing. The only downside to this style of binding, for college report purposes, is the machines are harder to come by and the covers usually cost a bit more.
  6. Tape Binding – Tape binding ultimately looks good (as long as it’s done right), but most tape binding formats are temporary. The ultimate weakness is that pages will eventually start falling out. Simply put, tape binding is a temporary binding format.

I hope this helps you with your college reports. Binding documents is easy to do, looks great and provides for a great first impression.

You can find our entire selection of book binding machines here. I personally like using binding covers for my report found here. Good luck with your college reports!

Best Thermal Binding Machines – Our Top 2 Picks

Thursday, December 2nd, 2010

Fellowes Helios Thermal Binding MachinesWhile thermal binding is nowhere near as popular as comb, wire or coil binding, it is still very popular and, in my personal opinion, looks really nice. Covers are already pre-made, which means you don’t have to track down report covers or backings for books.

Thermal binding is easy. Simply take your paper, place it in a thermal cover and let the machine do the rest. So which thermal binding machine is the best to use?

When it comes to thermal binding machines, there is really only one brand that hits the mark every time. This brand is Fellowes. Fellowes, known for making all sorts of shredders, also makes some of the best thermal binding machines available today.

Here are the best-rated thermal binding machines we offer:

Both of these machines are simple to use. The end results look great, and as mentioned earlier, the process is extremely easy.

You can find our entire selection of book binding machines here.

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