Posts Tagged ‘Wire Binding Machines’

Best Electric Wire Binding Machine for the Money – Intelli-Bind I23W

Friday, February 22nd, 2013

Intelli-Bind I23W Electric Wire Binding MachineWire binding is considered by many to be one of the classiest and nicest looking book binding formats around. For this reason, it is extremely popular for binding presentations and reports. If you are binding several books a day, or need something that makes punching paper easier, the Intelli-Bind I23W (found here) is an excellent option. It is also one of the cheapest electric wire binding machines on the market, costing hundreds of dollars less than comparable machines.

There are a lot of reasons why the I23W is such a good machine and a great option for you. To begin with, it is made of metal components. Even the casing is made out of metal, where many other manufactures have opted to go with a cheaper plastic housing. Even the wire closer handle on this thing feels like it was forged in a steel factory from WWII America. It is tough, which may also account for the heavy 85 pound shipping weight. All this metal goodness is a nice thing though and really helps it hold up with continuous use.

The I23W is a dual format wire binding machine. This means it can be used with 2:1 pitch twin loop wire or 3:1 pitch twin loop wire. The pitch of the wire is the amount of holes the machine punches per inch of paper. A 2:1 pitch creates about 22 holes along the 11″ side of a sheet of paper and a 3:1 pitch pattern is about 33 holes. The 3:1 pitch is the more common format used today, due to its tighter hole configuration, but the 2:1 pitch is popular for binding thicker books due to its higher sheet capacity. It is nice to have the luxury of using one or the other in the same machine.

The punching on this machine is all done with an electric motor. Up to 20 sheets of paper can be placed in the machine at a time. With the press of a button, the I23W will punch square holes into the paper. The margin depth on this machine can be adjusted to set the punched holes closer to the edge of the paper or farther into the paper. Individual holes can also be disabled or enabled using the build-in selectable punching pins (aka disengageable dies).

While the hole punching process is fully electric, the wire closing process is manual. There are few electric wire binding machines out there with an electric wire closer. One reason is because closing the wire with a handle is just as fast and easy (in many cases faster) than using an electric closer. All you need to do to use the wire closer is dial in the diameter of the wire you are using, insert the spine of the book into the closer and pull the handle (found on the left side of the machine). The wire closer, once the diameter is set, wont over close or under close the wire. The results are extremely professional.

The I23W can be used with all standard diameters or 2:1 and 3:1 pitch wire. It can also be used to punch holes in card stock, poly covers, clear covers and other types of paper. It is extremely versatile. As of this article, the I23W costs just $622, where the next closest metal build wire binding machine is the Akiles WireMacE, which comes in at $1626. That’s over $1,000 in savings on a machine of similar quality.

If you have questions about the Intelli-Bind I23W, please feel free to give us a call at 1-800-658-8788. You can find our entire selection of electric wire binding machines here.

How to Create Your Own Binders Full of Women

Thursday, October 18th, 2012

Binders full of WomenIf you have been watching the presidential debates lately, following Twitter or if you’re up on the news, you may have heard about Mitt Romney’s “Binders full of Women” comment. Regardless of whether you are a Republican or Democrat, and regardless of where you fall on the topic, you can easily create your own binder or book by using a book binding machine (found here). While you probably won’t actually use it to bind lists of women for hiring purposes, at ABC Office we offer a great selection of binding machines that can be used for creating presentations, reports, presentations, manuals and more.

There are three major types of book binding machines that are most commonly used in businesses, schools, government and other organizations. These are comb, wire and coil. They can all be used to create presentations, books, manuals and reports. While there are obvious aesthetic differences between them all, they are also small functional different as well. I would like to briefly cover the differences between all of these binding styles.

These are the three formats I recommend:

  • Comb BindingComb Binding (found here) – Comb binding is one of the oldest and most recognizable book binding formats. It has literally been around for decades. Supplies are cheap and extremely easy to find. Comb binding machines use a 19-ring plastic binding comb. It is called a 19-ring comb because a total of 19 comb fingers are inserted into rectangular-punched holes along the 11″ side of a sheet of paper. Comb binding elements are available in diameters up to 2″ and can be re-opened for adding or removing pages. Mitt Romney would probably love a comb binding machine because he could easily remove or insert pages much like a three-ring binder.
  • Wire Binding Wire Binding (found here) – Wire binding is often considered the “Professional” binding format. This is because the metal look and feel of a wire bound document looks high quality. The wire is inserted through round or square punched holes (depending on the machine) after which the wire is closed, sealing the bind shut. Wire binding comes in two primary formats. These are 2:1 pitch and 3:1 pitch (two holes per inch and three holes per inch). If you own a 3:1 pitch machine, you have to use 3:1 pitch coils. Unfortunately they are not interchangeable. This is a more permanent bind and pages cannot be removed or added without destroying the bind and adding a new binding element.
  • Coil Binding Coil Binding (found here) – Coil binding, frequently called spiral binding, is one of the most durable and easy-to-use binding formats. Modern coil binding uses PVC coils, which come in a wide variety of colors and diameters. They don’t bend, don’t easily break and allow pages to lay flat or completely wrap around. Coil binding is one of my personal favorites and many people use this for binding manuals, reports, cookbooks, scrapbooks and a lot more. The supplies are reasonably priced and the machines are easy to use.

These are the three most common binding formats we offer, but we also have a great selection of VeloBind machines, ProClick machines, thermal binding machines and more. You can find our entire selection of book binding machines here. We have over 30 years of experience with binding machines, so if you have a question, please don’t hesitate to call us at 1-800-658-8788. We are more than happy to help answer your questions. There is no such thing as a bad question when it comes to office equipment. Have a great day!

Overview of the Akiles WireMac-E 2:1 & 3:1

Friday, April 20th, 2012

Akiles WireMac-E 2:1 & 3:1 Pitch Wire Binding  MachinesProfessionals that frequently use binding machines (found here) know that not all binding machines are created equal. Some book binding machines have simple function features that are pretty straight forward, they have one style hole-punch, and one style of binding, and only fit one style of document. While other book binding machines have more complex bells and whistles in order for user to customize the machine for the unique specifications of a particular book or document.

If a company is only in the market to purchase a single binding machine then the purchasing agent needs to be aware of these differences so they don’t purchase a machine that is so basic that it won’t accommodate all their book binding needs. Likewise, it wouldn’t be prudent to purchase a machine with a lot of superfluous “whiz-bang” features that may never be utilized.

Fortuitous for purchasing agents, there are binding machines like the Akiles WireMac-E (found here) that offer an alternative to the ultra-simple and ultra-complicated. The Akiles WireMac-E is a heavy-duty twin-loop wire binding machine that offers a complete system of functions that are useful for every common book binding task and improve the end-user experience.

The hole punch mechanism of the Akiles WireMac-E binding machine can be easily adjusted from a 2:1 to a 3:1 pitch ratio to handle the capacity size of the document, booklet, journal, prospectus, report, guide, manuscript or periodical being bound together. The lower ratio will generally be the better choice for documents with a large number of pages.  In fact, the recommended capacity for the 2:1 ratio is over 250 pages, or 1 1/4 inch width, compared to the 225 pages or 9/16 of an inch width for the 3:1 ratio.

The Akiles WireMac-E binding machine is constructed with heavy-use die punches. Each of the punch dies can be engaged or disengaged to ensure that each punch will be clean and complete regardless of the size of paper being used. Some user features that the Akiles WireMac-E binding machine uses to make operation easy and concise include the side margin control, diameter scale and punching margin control. These features ensure that each punch will be consistent throughout the document, reducing the probability of user-error. The open punching throat enables various sizes of papers to be used in the machine. This paper compatibility feature is a real time saver and improves operator productivity.

The Akiles WireMac-E binding machine is designed to punch through 20 sheets of paper per punch and is built to handle commercial volume workloads. As such, the hole-punch mechanism is electric and operated by foot pedal. This allows the operator to free up his or her hands to continuously feed stacks of paper into the hole punch, or being attaching the binding wire.  The diameter scale on the binding machine helps to eliminate waste and improve production by indicating which size binding element that should be used to complete the document, based on its size.  The wire holder and wire closer control features on the Akiles WireMac-E holds the binding wire in place and makes the insertion through the pages of the document a much easier  process for the operator.

The Akiles WireMac-E binding machine was developed and produced by Akiles Products, Inc.  Based in California, Akiles Products manufactures some of the top selling binding and laminating equipment on the market.

Get the features you need without paying for the features you don’t. You can find the Akiles WireMac-E by visiting us here. Please don’t hesitate to call and speak with one of our Binding Machine Specialists at 1-800-658-8788 with any questions.

Can you Manually Close Wire or Reuse Wire for Book Binding?

Friday, December 9th, 2011

If you have a wire binding punch, lack a wire closer on your binding machine or simply want to speed up binding operations, you may wonder if you can manually close twin loop wire by hand. It is a question I get from customers from time to time. I have also had customers ask if they can reuse the wire. I will answer these questions and more in this article.

Twin Loop Wire Binding Supplies

Having personally tried to close wire using my hand. Can it be done? Yes. Does it look good? No…absolutely not. The problem is that a wire closer, used with most wire binding machines, closes all the rings of wire at the same time, providing a nice and even look. Closing each individual loop (32 loops with 3:1 pitch and 21 loops with 2:1 pitch) results in each loop being closed a little more or a little less than the next or previous loop. To put it simple, it looks horrible.

Twin Loop Wire BindingSo can you open wire and reuse it? Unfortunately this is not a possibility either. Having tried this myself, I can vouch for the fact that it is impossible. While I have seen some wire binding machines that include a wire opener, that actually does an OK job, it still never looks as good as a new wire binding element. The problem is that opening the wire causes kinks, crimps and gets fatigue spots in the wire that never look right, even when the wire is re-closed. It is also extremely hard to remove wire from a wire bound book by hand. It can easily rip and damage the document in the process.

I hate to be the bearer of bad news, but twin loop wire binding is not forgiving. If you need to be able to reuse or reopen a binding element, I recommend you consider using a comb binding machine. Coil binding, while it can be re-used, is easy to remove if you need to add or remove a page.

You can find our entire selection of wire binding machines here, wire binding supplies here and book binding machines here.

Akiles WireMac-Combo Binding Machine Review

Monday, December 5th, 2011

Akiels WireMac-Combo Wire / Comb Binding MachineAre you having trouble settling on either comb or wire binding? Do you feel that you have reports, presentations or books that could benefit from both binding styles? If you are torn, or are having trouble making a decision, you should consider the Akiles WireMac-Combo (found here). This book binding machine can be used to bind books using comb or wire. I have used this machine and this is my review.

Akiles is known for making some of the best binding machines out there. Having used over a dozen different models of Akiles machines myself, I can tell you that I personally like using them over GBC, Fellowes and many other brands. The build quality is simply some of the best I have ever seen in an office machine. The WireMac-Combo falls right in line with this tradition.

The WireMac-Combo is literally made from all-metal construction. Everything from the outer shell of the machine to the inner guts to the handles are made from metal. There are a few wood and plastic trim pieces, but I would say that at least 90% of the machine is made from metal. That really means something in a world where plastic seems to be replacing metal. Head to head, metal always wins over plastic.

The WireMac wire binding machine and the Akiles MegaBind are two great machines. The WireMac-Combo takes these two machines and smashes them into one unit. The end result is pure engineering genius. The WireMac-Combo has to separate and unique punching dies. One die punches paper in a 19-ring plastic comb hole pattern and the other punches paper using a 2:1 pitch or a 3:1 pitch hole pattern (depending on the version of the WireMac-Comb you go with).

Two separate punches mean you never have to worry about swapping out dies. Everything is right there in one machine. The WireMac-Combo also includes a manually operated wire close and a manually operated plastic comb opener / closer. While this may sound very complicated, and the picture of the machine may seem intimidating, it is actually pretty easy to use. Just remember, while there are 4 different handles on the machine, you will only ever use 2 of them when binding a book. Two of the handles are for wire and the other 2 are for comb.

The WireMac-Combo doesn’t just bind books using twin loop wire or plastic comb. It also includes a wide range of “luxury” features. This includes an adjustable margin depth (for the punches) and independent disengageable dies. This allows you to turn of individual punching pins, making custom book binding easy. This feature essentially cuts out the dreaded “half punched” hole. The base of the punching dies also feature a printed diagram showing you where the holes will be punched.

The WireMac-Combo also includes gauges, diagrams and tools that ensure proper binding. This includes a wire closing gauge that keeps the closer from under or over closing the wire.

This machine is excellent for use in an office or copy center. While a robust machine (20.5″ x 27″ x 20″), it will easily sit on most desks or tables. It is a little heavy, weighing in at 64 pounds, it can still be easily moved around by a couple of people.

Having used this machine, I would like to personally vouch for its quality and longevity. This machine is built to last and will easily hold up to daily use. Simply put, our customers love this machine.

You can find the Akiles WireMac-Combo wire and comb binding machine here and our entire selection of book binding machines here. Please do not hesitate to call us at 1-800-658-8788 with any questions.

Akiles WireMac Wire Binding Machine Video

Thursday, December 1st, 2011

Akiles WireMac Wire Binding MachineIf you’re considering purchasing the Akiles WireMac, you may want to see how it works. Having used this machine myself, I can vouch for the fact that it is a solid machine and is easy to use. A few years ago we shot a detailed video demo of the WireMac in use. I will include that video in this article.

Before I show you the video, I would like to explain why the Akiles WireMac is such a popular machine with our customers. To begin with, it has been around for some time and has developed a stalwart reputation with our customers. It is very common for this machine to literally last for years without experiencing any issues.

You can buy the WireMac in two different hole patterns. The most common is the 2:1 pitch, which is two holes per inch. This size is the most common because it can be used to bind the thickest books. The 2:1 pitch hole pattern can bind up to 1 ¼” of paper at a time. The 3:1 pitch, which has a tighter hole pattern (3 holes per inch) can only bind up to 9/16″ of paper. Both patterns look good, and if you don’t need to bind over ½” of paper, either format will work for you.

The Akiles WireMac itself is one of the best-built machines we offer. It features durable metal construction, which includes the innermost components. It features fully disengageable punching pins, an adjustable margin depth and much more.

This is a video demo of the Akiles WireMac in use.

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As you can see from this video, the WireMac is a pretty slick machine. Not only does it do a great job binding presentations, reports and booklets, but it looks great too. It is heavy enough to hold its own, yet is light enough to be used on just about any desk or countertop. Simply put, this is a great deal and a great option for binding paper.

You can find the Akiles WireMac binding machine here and our entire selection of wire binding machines here. Please feel free to call us at 1-800-658-8788 with any questions.

Different Types of Akiles WireMac Binding Machines

Thursday, December 1st, 2011

The Akiles WireMac is one of the most popular wire binding machines in the United States. These machines are used to bind reports, presentations, books and much more. You will find the WireMac in businesses, schools, churches and other organizations. We currently offer 4 different variations of the WireMac. This article will explain the differences between each.

Types of Akiles WireMac Binding Machines

Akiles WireMac Binding MachineAkiles WireMac (2:1 or 3:1) – The first and most common version is the standard Akiles WireMac (found here). It is a manually operated machine and is available in a 2:1 pitch hole pattern or a 3:1 pitch hole pattern. This wire binding machine is completely manually operated. It includes a handle for punching paper and a separate handle for closing the wire. It features fully disengageable punching dies, an adjustable margin depth and a dial that sets the wire closer (prevents over closing or under closing wire). This is the most popular WireMac. This is because it is the least expensive, yet still features an extremely durable metal frame and shell.

Akiles WireMac-Combo Binding MachineAkiles WireMac-Combo (Comb / Wire) – This version of the WireMac combines both 2:1 wire and comb or a 3:1 wire and plastic 19-ring comb binding. The Akiles WireMac-Combo (found here) features a wire punch and a comb binding punch. Also included is a wire close and a comb opener / closer. This is especially nice for people that don’t want to settle on any one binding format. While this machine is completely manual, it is easy to use and is fast to operate. This machine is robust, powerful and is made from durable metal construction. It also features disengageable punching pins, an adjustable margin depth and much more.

Akiles WireMac-Duo 2:1 / 3:1 Binding MachineAkiles WireMac-Duo (2:1 & 3:1) – If you can’t settle on a wire binding hole pattern, you may want to consider the Akiles WireMac-Duo (found here). This version of the WireMac features both a 2:1 pitch and a 3:1 pitch punching die. This allows you to create reports using a tighter hole patter (3:1 pitch) or a wider spaced hole pattern (2:1 pitch) that allows for thicker books. It can also punch through clear covers, card stock and standard paper. This is a great wire binding machine for a business environment due to its versatility. The WireMac-Duo is a very popular binding machine. It is both affordable and features a superb build quality.

Akiles WireMac-E Binding MachineAkiles WireMac-E Electric Wire Binding Machine (2:1 or 3:1) – If you really like the WireMac, but need to increase your binding output, you may want to consider using the Akiles WireMac-E (found here). This version of the WireMac features an electric punch and a manual wire closer. This machine is available in either a 2:1 pitch hole pattern or a 3:1 pitch hole pattern. Unfortunately, as of the writing of this article, there is no WireMac-E-Combo that combines both hole patterns. This wire binder features a foot pedal for hands-free operation and can punch 20 sheets of paper at a time. This machine is a beast and will easily keep up with your daily wire binding operations.

The WireMac line of wire binding machines has an excellent track record with our customers. As long as you know the differences between the models, you should be very happy with your purchase. I personally love selling Akiles WireMac machines because I know that I won’t have to worry about customer service issues later down the road. I personally recommend that you invest a little extra money in a WireMac that will easily last for years, versus a slightly cheaper machine that may last 1 year.

You can find our entire selection of Akiles wire binding machines here. Please feel free to contact one of our customer service representatives at 1-800-658-8788 with any questions. We are more than happy to help you find the right machine. You are also more than welcome to post your question as a comment at the end of this article.

Best Binding Machines for Children’s Books

Wednesday, November 9th, 2011

Binding Children's BooksIf’ you’re binding children’s books, you probably want to use a format that is durable, tough and resilient. My 3-year-old son was recently given a book that was bound in twin-loop wire. As you might imagine, that book isn’t in such good shape anymore. When it comes to children’s books, a lot more needs to be taken into consideration than just looks. I will cover in this article the best binding machines you will want to use for binding kid’s books.

If you will be binding a child’s book using a binding element (i.e. Wire, Coil or Comb), you need something that is tough, can take an impact and will cut down on page tearing. The two most resilient binding formats are comb and coil. I’ll explain why I would personally use these binding styles for a kid’s book.

The one format I would never use is twin loop wire, unless you’re binding a teenager’s book. Wire, to put it simple, bends and looses its form when stepped on, thrown on the ground, stacked on with other books or is thrown in a backpack.  I have seen some books bound in thick-gauge twin loop wire. The thicker gauge stuff seems to hold up much better than your standard gauge twin loop wire.

As mentioned earlier, I would use comb or coil for a children’s book. Let me explain the benefits and the disadvantages of both.

Comb Binding Children's BooksCOMB BINDING – This is my second choice for binding kid’s books. This format is made from tough plastic and will rarely break or bend. Comb binding supplies are cheap, costing very little for a box of 100 elements. Comb is also available in dozens of colors, making it a colorful choice for binding children’s books. The individual comb fingers are wide, providing added support to pages, making them tougher to accidentally rip out.

The biggest con to comb binding is the fact that combs can be re-opened, even without a machine. It is tough to do, and extremely unlikely to happen, but it is possible. I still don’t think this should count out comb binding.

Because you may be binding books smaller than 8 ½” x 11″, I would recommend that you use comb binder with selectable punching pins.

These are some comb binding machines I recommend for binding kid’s books:

Coil Binding Children's BooksCOIL BINDING – Coil binding is my first choice for binding kid’s books. Binding coils are made out of extremely durable PVC plastic. These coils won’t bend or break and can withstand the unforgiving wrath of a child. Binding coils are colorful, which kids like, and can be used to bind thick or thin books.

I personally recommend using 4:1 pitch coil for children’s books (4 holes per inch) as the wide hole pattern makes the pages harder to tear out. A 5:1 pitch hole pattern (5 holes per inch) have the holes too close together for kids, making the pages much easier to tear out.
As you will probably bind books in a wide range of sizes, I recommend using a coil-binding machine with disengagable punching pins and an electric coil inserter.

These are some coil binding machines I recommend for binding children’s books:

Hopefully these recommendations help you in your book binding endeavors. We have decades of experience with book binding machines, so please feel free to call us at 1-800-658-8788 with any questions. You can find our entire selection of binding machines here.

Troubleshooting: Pages Keep Ripping out of Bound Book

Friday, November 4th, 2011

Wire Binding Machine TroubleshootingWhen you bind a booklet, presentation or report, you typically expect that book to hold up for some time…right? You certainly don’t want paper ripping out as you turn pages. If your comb, coil or wire bound document is experiencing pages tearing out, premature wear, pages binding or overall difficulty in using a book bound in these formats, you’ll want to read this guide.

Comb, wire and coil binding are all three very distinct binding formats, but they all suffer from similar issues when a book is bound incorrectly. While binding a book is extremely easy to do, there are a few minor settings, if left ignored, can result in a complete failure of a binding job. Here are the two most common issues:

Pages Keep Tearing Out:
If you have pages that seem to be tearing out of your book, you are probably experiencing issues with your margin depth, which is how far holes are punched into the paper. As a general rule, you want to punch holes deeper into the paper when binding thicker books. Thinner books can have the holes punched closer to the edge. If you punch holes close to the edge, while binding a thicker book, pages will eventually begin to tear out.

Many modern binding machines have a margin depth selector that will allow you to adjust how far into the paper the holes are punched based on the thickness of the book. Akiles machines are especially easy to use when it comes to adjusting the margin depth.

Unfortunately not all binding machines have a margin depth adjustment. If this is the case, you will either need to deal with the occasional page ripping out, bind thinner books or upgrade to a different machine.

Here are three great binding machines that feature an adjustable margin depth:

Paper Binds When Turning Pages: If you’re experiencing issues turning the pages in your bound document, the guilty culprit is the binding element itself. What you are probably doing is using a binding comb, wire or coil that is too small for the paper you are binding. What you need to do is use a slightly larger diameter binding element.

Many binding machines now include a diameter selection guide. If you’re binding machine doesn’t have this feature, you can get a good idea on the diameter you need by looking at our supplies pages. Our binding supply pages feature the diameter and how many sheets it can bind.

Binding Supplies

Hopefully this guide helps you out and helps cut down on frustrations. If for any reason you need a new machine, you can find our entire selection of binding machines here.

Twin Loop Wire Binding Supplies and Wire Gauges

Thursday, July 14th, 2011

Wire Binding SuppliesI had a customer pose a really good question to me this morning. They asked me, “Do your twin loop wire binding supplies get thicker as the diameter increases?” I had never thought of that before and had to do a little research to find the answer.

According to this customer, they have purchased wire of varying gauge qualities, with some wire staying the same thickness even when the diameter increased. They claimed that with “cheaper” twin loop wire, the wire gauge was so pathetic that the books got all bent out of shape after only being used a few times.

I decided I needed to go out to the warehouse and investigate this for myself. I broke out a box of ¼” wire, ½” wire, 7/8″ wire and 1 ¼” wire. I broke out a micrometer (although the difference was visually evident) and can confirm that the gauge thickness of our wire does get thicker as the diameter increases.

Wire Binding Supplies

I figured our wire had to get thicker as we carry the highest quality wire available for wire binding machines. The 7/8″ and 1 ¼” twin loop wire was dramatically thicker than the ¼” wire. This makes sense. The thicker the book, the more strain that is being put on the wire.

Not only is our twin loop wire (both 2:1 and 3:1 pitches) high quality stuff, but it is available to you at an excellent price. You can find our entire selection of twin loop wire supplies here and our large selection of wire binding machines here.

Good luck and happy binding!

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